Do you mix your own feed?

Discussion in 'Feeding & Watering Your Flock' started by Felicia, Sep 20, 2009.

  1. Felicia

    Felicia Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Feb 26, 2009
    Michigan
    I am looking into mixing and making up recipes for all my animals so that I can make sure they are eating very healthy.

    Any suggestions or good websites for chicken feed recipes? Duck/Goose recipes? What do you feed your chickens?
     
  2. fasbendera

    fasbendera Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jan 30, 2009
    Midwest
    Quote:I had a similar post and this reply had a link.
     
    Last edited: Sep 20, 2009
  3. Princess Amri

    Princess Amri Is Mostly Harmless

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    Yes, a great website! I use that recipe soo much!
     
  4. HBuehler

    HBuehler Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jun 30, 2009
    Lebanon TN
    We used to mix our own..much like greenpastures but then our feed store started doing one and since they buy in bulk it's actually cheaper and all whole grains and nuts. [​IMG] they love it.
     
  5. txchickie

    txchickie Chillin' With My Peeps

    Nov 15, 2008
    Texas
    Umm...I mix big tubs of oats, corn, milo, and black oil sunflower seeds together for treats. But that's just because I'm bored [​IMG]
     
  6. Hamletchick

    Hamletchick Out Of The Brooder

    Felicia looks like you have a Bouvier family member? Am I correct. Very handsome anyway. [​IMG]
     
  7. redhen

    redhen Kiss My Grits... Premium Member

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    Quote:whats milo? where do i get it at? thanks
     
  8. txchickie

    txchickie Chillin' With My Peeps

    Nov 15, 2008
    Texas
    Quote:whats milo? where do i get it at? thanks

    Milo is a grain. I buy it in 50lb bags at the feed store, right next to the corn, oats, and starter/layer feeds

    ETA: I don't think it's got a lot of nutritional value for birds, but as I said I make my own "treats" [​IMG] The chickens seem to love it. It adds some color to my mix [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Sep 21, 2009
  9. redhen

    redhen Kiss My Grits... Premium Member

    35,112
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    May 19, 2008
    Western MA
    Quote:whats milo? where do i get it at? thanks

    Milo is a grain. I buy it in 50lb bags at the feed store, right next to the corn, oats, and starter/layer feeds

    ETA: I don't think it's got a lot of nutritional value for birds, but as I said I make my own "treats" [​IMG] The chickens seem to love it. It adds some color to my mix [​IMG]

    LOL thanks! I'll try to find some.
     
  10. Chris09

    Chris09 Circle (M) Ranch

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    whats milo?

    Sorghum (Milo)

    Sorghum is a genus of numerous species of grasses, some of which are raised for grain and many of which are used as fodder plants either cultivated or as part of pasture. The plants are cultivated in warmer climates worldwide. Species are native to tropical and subtropical regions of all continents in addition to the South West Pacific and Australasia. Sorghum is in the subfamily Panicoideae and the tribe Andropogoneae (the tribe of big bluestem and sugar cane
    Numerous Sorghum species are used for food (as grain and in sorghum syrup or "sorghum molasses"), fodder, the production of alcoholic beverages, as well as biofuels. Most species are drought tolerant and heat tolerant and are especially important in arid regions. They form an important component of pastures in many tropical regions. Sorghum species are an important food crop in Africa, Central America, and South Asia and is the "fifth most important cereal crop grown in the world".[1]
    A Sorghum species, Johnson Grass, is classified as an invasive species in the US by the Department of Agriculture.[2]
    The reclaimed stalks of the sorghum plant are used to make a decorative millwork material marketed as Kirei board.
    Sweet Sorghum syrup is known as molasses in some parts of the U.S., though it is not true molasses.
    Some species of sorghum can contain levels of hydrogen cyanide, hordenine and nitrates lethal to grazing animals in the early stages of the plant's growth. Stressed plants, even at later stages of growth, can also contain toxic levels of cyanide.
    In China, sorghum is fermented and distilled to produce maotai, which is regarded as the country's most famous liquor.
    In India, and other places, Sweet Sorghum stalks are used for producing bio-fuel by squeezing the juice and then fermenting into ethanol. Texas A&M University in the United States is currently running trials to produce the best varieties for ethanol production from sorghum leaves and stalks in the USA.

    I. History:
    Farmers on the hot, dry plains from Texas to South Dakota grow and use grain sorghum like Corn Belt farmers use corn. Large acreages of grain sorghum are also grown in Africa and Asia in areas where the climate is too hot and dry for corn.
    During the past 25 years, the grain sorghum acreage in the U.S. has ranged from 15 to 18 million acres per year. Grain sorghum acreage is somewhat greater than acreages for oats and barley, but considerably less than the land area planted to corn, wheat, and soybeans.
    In cooler, more humid regions, corn is usually a better choice than grain sorghum, but renewed interest in grain sorghum occurs whenever hotter and drier than normal growing seasons are experienced.
    II. Uses:
    Worldwide, sorghum is a food grain for humans. In the United States, sorghum is used primarily as a feed grain for livestock. Feed value of grain sorghum is similar to corn. The grain has more protein and fat than corn, but is lower in vitamin A. When compared with corn on a per pound basis, grain sorghum feeding value ranges from 90% to nearly equal to corn. The grain is highly palatable to livestock, and intake seldom limits livestock productivity. However, some sorghum varieties and hybrids which were developed to deter birds are less palatable due to tannins and phenolic compounds in the seed. The grain should be cracked or rolled before feeding to cattle; this improves the portion digested.
    Pasturing cattle or sheep on sorghum stubble, after the grain has been harvested, is a common practice. Both roughage and dropped heads are utilized. Stubble with secondary growth must be pastured carefully because of the danger of prussic acid (HCN) poisoning.
    Grain sorghum may also be used as whole-plant silage, however another sorghum, sweet sorghum, was developed as a silage crop. Sweet sorghum produces much higher forage yields than grain sorghum, but feed quality will likely be lesser because there is no grain. Some growers mix grain sorghum with soybeans to produce a higher protein silage crop.



    Chris​
     
    Last edited: Sep 21, 2009

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