dubbing roosters

Discussion in 'Managing Your Flock' started by omartorres, Jan 26, 2012.

  1. omartorres

    omartorres Out Of The Brooder

    72
    0
    39
    Nov 6, 2011
    Hello, i want you to show me some pictures of your dubbed roosters or if you have a before dubbing and after dubbing.I want to show my bb bantam but i dont know if i should dubb him.And i have a question does it hurt a rooster when he is getting dubbed? and how much time does it take it to heel? thanks
     
    Last edited: Jan 26, 2012
  2. SteveBaz

    SteveBaz Chillin' With My Peeps

    2,130
    25
    173
    Aug 6, 2011
    Pacific North West
    One reason Roosters are dubbed is because in cold climates they will get frost bite. It is much more humane to dub roosters instead of letting them get frost bit. When frost biten they will get gangrene and the comb and wattles will eventually fall off. Another reason for roosters to be dubbed is for show purposes. It is a breed standard for game-fowl and all must be dubbed if someone is going to show them. Roosters can sometimes get mean is a reason, why leave a spur on that can hurt someone? The spur is pointed and sharp and should be taken off or shortened. If a rooster were to hit you with his spur you would not want to feel the sharp point, or a short blunt spur for sure? This is just common sense anyway. Another good reason spur’s are also taken off is so the rooster doesn’t hurt the hen’s and leave sore's on their backs when the rooster rides them.

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Jan 26, 2012
  3. centrarchid

    centrarchid Chicken Obsessed

    17,728
    2,352
    466
    Sep 19, 2009
    Holts Summit, Missouri

    Yes, it hurts a lot. I still do for reason mentioned above plus it not having a frost bitten comb reduces odds birds will get frost bitten toes. Bleeding usually stops in seconds to minutes. Ideally such handled birds be kept isolated and under minimal stress so they are less likely to bumb freshly cut tissue against pen wall, caging or another birds. Healing is very rapid with being complete within a couple of weeks. I like to do it when temperatures are low since the process is stressfull and additive to heat stress, plus you do not want insects getting involved.

    Surprisingly the trimmed birds forget very quickly that you did it to them. Best to have someone expereinced to physically show you how it is done. Key for me is proper restraining of bird and having a good pair of surgical scissors.
     
  4. runsw/scissors

    runsw/scissors Chillin' With My Peeps

     
  5. centrarchid

    centrarchid Chicken Obsessed

    17,728
    2,352
    466
    Sep 19, 2009
    Holts Summit, Missouri
    From what I have observed, anytime a bird is stressed / not feeling well when wind chill is extreme, they are more prone to frost bite of exposed extremeties. My experience with birds having single combed already severely affected by frostbite is that they become stressed as frostbitten comb tissue necroids / rots. Such affected birds are litterally sick fighting an infection. As the body fights back by elevating core temperature, it can often sacrifice sending warm blood flow to extremeties such as toes. If problem is extreme enough toes can become frostbitten. This does not happen very often with my birds but has always involved single combed birds that were not dubbed.

    I live in area where temperature easily drops to around -10 F and birds are exposed to ambient temperatures. If your birds do not suffer temperatures lower than +10 F then I would not be worried about toes but comb will still be vulnerable. Birds with frostbitten / necroiding combs are generally less thrifty and under performers in breeding pen so I manage to control frostbite.
     
  6. kaylee gee

    kaylee gee Chillin' With My Peeps

    159
    1
    88
    Jul 5, 2012
    Lehigh Acres, FL
    I saw this exact thing on a website just now. Siting your source is always good.
     
  7. Pele

    Pele Chillin' With My Peeps

    4,392
    112
    243
    Feb 25, 2011
    Boise
    You don't need to cite well known fact. Fact: roosters with large combs in cold climates get frost bitten combs. That's like challenging someone to prove that standing a long time hurts your feet.
     
  8. kaylee gee

    kaylee gee Chillin' With My Peeps

    159
    1
    88
    Jul 5, 2012
    Lehigh Acres, FL

    When you quote someone word for word though it is important to state where you took it.
     
  9. Pele

    Pele Chillin' With My Peeps

    4,392
    112
    243
    Feb 25, 2011
    Boise
    Ah, sorry, misunderstood what you were saying. I can see where the concern about plagerism would come from.
     
    1 person likes this.

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by