Easy to build small coop ideas

NatJ

Free Ranging
Mar 20, 2017
5,003
9,012
526
USA
The only predators I have are foxes and rats.
The coop will be behind a shed right next to tree which is up against a fence so it is quite sheltered, the run will be completely roofed so water and food will stay out in the run.
so if I made it out of pallets do I need to fill all of the holes with wood?

For that location, I think pallets for the sides would be enough weather protection, with hardware cloth to keep out the rats. Of course you'll need a waterproof roof--but that could be a piece of wood, or a pallet with hardware cloth (because of rats) and then tarp (because of water.) Or any other combination of materials that will keep out both the rain and the predators.
 

CinnaBun

Chirping
Apr 9, 2020
107
124
83
Southern California
Plastic Playhouse- Ive seen some really nice conversions. Search this forum too. And look at little wooden playhouses- cute coop conversions too.


Some challenges with plastic playhouses (not impossible, just things to think about)
1- ventilation up high enough
2- keeping the water out when it rains (the roof doesn’t necessarily keep the water out and with sideways rain, it will come in through the windows
 

Acre4Me

Crossing the Road
Premium Feather Member
Nov 12, 2017
5,586
15,152
797
Western Ohio
Good luck.

you could recycle an old dresser (two face to face would be wider. Base cabinets from someone’s kitchen remodel- In US these are 2’ deep, so 2 together would be 4’ deep x whatever length. Another very common piece of furniture that everyone gets rid of here is the old style TV cabinets popular in 80s-early2000’s. I’ve seen all these converted to animal enclosures- sometimes for large lizards, sometimes for quail, sometimes for chickens. Since you will be housing bantams, they should fit just fine with enough room.
 

SpotTheCat

Songster
Jan 19, 2021
197
241
105
UK
Plastic Playhouse- Ive seen some really nice conversions. Search this forum too. And look at little wooden playhouses- cute coop conversions too.


Some challenges with plastic playhouses (not impossible, just things to think about)
1- ventilation up high enough
2- keeping the water out when it rains (the roof doesn’t necessarily keep the water out and with sideways rain, it will come in through the windows
this is the space I have, there is a tree on the left and the coop will be where the dog crate is about, the rain comes from the shed side (the wood on the right) so it is sheltered from the rain.

C202A300-FD75-487F-AD24-C66E635D4219.jpeg
 

SpotTheCat

Songster
Jan 19, 2021
197
241
105
UK
Good luck.

you could recycle an old dresser (two face to face would be wider. Base cabinets from someone’s kitchen remodel- In US these are 2’ deep, so 2 together would be 4’ deep x whatever length. Another very common piece of furniture that everyone gets rid of here is the old style TV cabinets popular in 80s-early2000’s. I’ve seen all these converted to animal enclosures- sometimes for large lizards, sometimes for quail, sometimes for chickens. Since you will be housing bantams, they should fit just fine with enough room.
Thank you,
I will look at those.
I think most thing like that are narrower here.
 

Mtnboomer

Songster
Mar 17, 2019
1,000
1,714
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Southwest Virginia (mountains)
Piggybacking a bit, but how would you use a hoopcoop somewhere where it rains and snows? Wouldn't the birds get cold and soaked?
Unless im mistaken in my vision of a hoop coop (semi-circle/airplane hanger looking shape with support poles, often pvc, covered with a tarp or membrane for shelter?) The covering material protects the birds from rain. As for snow, it would depend upon what type of load you're talking about in your area. Higher snow load would require more robust supports. Instead of pvc, you might use metal tubing or wood. Wire mesh would go under the tarp or membrane or additional longitudinal supports may need to be added, closer spacing of the poles...etc.

My birds free range outside in snow, rain etc. They often seek shelter during adverse weather in my wood shed, under their coop, or on our porch. But today in fact, they are standing in the middle of our yard in a cold steady rain. Their feathers are remarkable insulators so unless its extreme cold or the limitations of specific breeds most will handle the cold and getting a little wet so long as there is a place to dry off when the want.
 

SpotTheCat

Songster
Jan 19, 2021
197
241
105
UK
What does the roof of the shed look like above this area?
I am not to sure what you want to know about it so hopefully this answers your question.
Thats the back of the shed so the triangle side, I don’t think it sticks out at all but I am not sure. I can get you pictures of it tomorrow if you need.
 

Mtnboomer

Songster
Mar 17, 2019
1,000
1,714
222
Southwest Virginia (mountains)
this is the space I have, there is a tree on the left and the coop will be where the dog crate is about, the rain comes from the shed side (the wood on the right) so it is sheltered from the rain.

View attachment 2502360
Things still look pretty wet in your photo. But the photo is great to better show what site constraints with which you are working. The quick and easy 1st thing that pops in my mind is to extend the shed roof to cover the area to the tree. Support it with 2 poles at the tree end. Fence in the side walls with HC (using the shed wall as one of them) with support poles 6-8 ft aprt and build a simple box/hutch style coop inside the run sized adequately per # of birds you want.
If extending the existing roof is beyond something you feel comfortable with, just add an independent roof with support poles or elevate the coop and let the underside offer a dry space for the birds.

Like mentioned before, almost anything can be made into a chicken coop and don't be afraid of making mistakes. The best lessons are learned from our mistakes. Its ok to build something cheap and adequate to get you started. As you learn and gain experience you can always tweak or adjust things or hell salvage what you can and tear it down and rebuild.
My wife often reminds me to "keep it simple stupid" so dont over think it. She means it in an endearing inspirational way....I think.
 

SpotTheCat

Songster
Jan 19, 2021
197
241
105
UK
Things still look pretty wet in your photo. But the photo is great to better show what site constraints with which you are working. The quick and easy 1st thing that pops in my mind is to extend the shed roof to cover the area to the tree. Support it with 2 poles at the tree end. Fence in the side walls with HC (using the shed wall as one of them) with support poles 6-8 ft aprt and build a simple box/hutch style coop inside the run sized adequately per # of birds you want.
If extending the existing roof is beyond something you feel comfortable with, just add an independent roof with support poles or elevate the coop and let the underside offer a dry space for the birds.

Like mentioned before, almost anything can be made into a chicken coop and don't be afraid of making mistakes. The best lessons are learned from our mistakes. Its ok to build something cheap and adequate to get you started. As you learn and gain experience you can always tweak or adjust things or hell salvage what you can and tear it down and rebuild.
My wife often reminds me to "keep it simple stupid" so dont over think it. She means it in an endearing inspirational way....I think.
The area behind the shed is where the coop is going to be, the run will be where I was standing to take that picture.
Here are some pictures of where the run will be, to the right is the shed.
1062F75B-B9A7-44DD-B90A-0F01361B60CE.jpeg
A3C50BC4-CA64-432E-9CB1-F457F694B534.jpeg

I am sure I will make mistakes hopefully more planing means fewer mistakes.
thank you
 

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