EE GENDERS

Discussion in 'What Breed Or Gender is This?' started by rir264, Aug 9, 2016.

  1. rir264

    rir264 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    This has probably been explained but I can not find it, CAN anyone. Tell me why EE's can't be sexed like other birds before they are shipped out to stores. I bought three PULLETS but now I am reading that you cannot tell for several months? Thanks for your thoughts.
     
  2. howfunkyisurchicken

    howfunkyisurchicken Overrun With Chickens

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    If you bought your EEs as sexed pullets, they very likely are. However, keep in mind, with vent sexing, there is a 10% margin for error. Most likely they will be girls, don't stress about it for now. If any of them end up being cockerels, lots of folks will take them off your hands for free or a small fee (if you can't/don't want to keep them).
     
  3. lomine

    lomine Chillin' With My Peeps

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  4. rir264

    rir264 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Hey thanks, I was just getting a little concerned because one of the birds that I got was bigger than the other two it has got a lot of solid red around the neck. then I was reading all the posts about getting boys instead of girls and I thought that maybe there was a problem with sexing so I thought I would ask. Thanks for the info.
     
  5. junebuggena

    junebuggena Chicken Obsessed

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    Red around the neck is not a concern. It's a deep, rusty red through the shoulder/wing area that indicates cockerel. I'm pretty darn good at sexing Easter Eggers between 6 and 8 weeks old.
     
  6. drumstick diva

    drumstick diva Still crazy after all these years. Premium Member

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    agree
     
  7. rir264

    rir264 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    ok I feel better now!! I was just concerned because I really did not want a boy, I have several bantams, boy bantams too, and I did not want the larger roo to try to fight with them and possible kill them as roos will do. Thanks for your responses I just love this site!!
     
  8. junebuggena

    junebuggena Chicken Obsessed

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    Most roosters/cockerels won't fight till the death. They just fight long enough to determine their pecking order. The key is to introduce the younger ones to flock as soon as possible, while they are immature and aren't seen as a threat. It's when you try to introduce adult roosters that the fighting gets really intense.
     
  9. rir264

    rir264 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Apr 29, 2013
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    So it shouldn't be a problem if they are bigger? Was thinking that they would being bigger and of course stronger that they would really hurt the smaller one. I have several bantam roos and they were added to the coop just like you said when they were immature. Maybe you can answer this for me. I have an older too again bantam, he got sick here a while back and I had to pull him out of the coop to give him medicine when I put him back he got banished to the inside of the coop so I took the offender and segregated him for a while when I put him back the same thing happened so I pulled him out again. I have a real soft place for this older roo because he is challenged and he does not get around very well. Is there any hope in putting them all back together or is this just the natural order of things. If it is the natural order will the older on ever get out of the coop again if they are back together? Thanks for your thoughts
     
  10. junebuggena

    junebuggena Chicken Obsessed

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    Most of the time, excessive bullying and territorial behavior is caused by too little space. Anytime you remove a flock member, even for a short period of time, it changes the flock's social dynamic. Reintroductions are always a challenge when dealing with adult birds, with mature roosters it's even more so. They need lots of space, more the average 4 sq ft of coop and 10 sq ft of run, to help reduce territorial tensions. And reintroductions need to be gradual. This is where a small grow-out coop comes in handy. You let the bird needing reintroduction live next to the flock, but the others can't bully. They get used to having him around again and then you start to let them have free-range time together. Then, when everything is smooth during the ranging time, you can let him live with the main flock again.
    Unless you have about 10 hens per rooster, I suggest you setup a bachelor coop and run for the boys. Without any hens living with them, they don't really have much to fight over.
     

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