mangled

Songster
11 Years
12 Years
Jan 25, 2008
1,467
8
196
The Wilds of Western PA
I have a strange mixed flock - see my signature. I have quite a few mature SLW girls and a half dozen more or less of "mutt" hens. Three are big chubby barred rocks and the other are unknowns. I received the girls and my roos full grown from a lady losing her home to a divorce. I have NO idea what they are mixes of.
Now, my little EE roo has become quite the romeo around the yard since I took the SLW roos and penned them. If my EE roo is breeding my mutt hens and my SLW hens, does he pass on the tinted egg gene?
I'm in the process of McGyvering an incubator together, and as soon as I get the humidty thing worked out, I'm going to try to hatch a few, just for my own, I've no interest in selling chikens.
Just curious what I may get. My other roo is a huge BO monster roo.
Here is a pic of my EE roo:


Thanks-
Em
 

mangled

Songster
11 Years
12 Years
Jan 25, 2008
1,467
8
196
The Wilds of Western PA
Wonderful to know.

My EE hen lays the prettiest blue/green eggs, and I was told they are from the same roo, so hopefully he will pass that on.

Thanks so much!
Em
 

Cuban Longtails

Flock Mistress
12 Years
Sep 20, 2007
6,026
33
263
Northeast Texas
IF he has the blue gene he will pass it to his daughters. If you have brown egg laying hens, then their daughters will likely lay green or olive eggs because color will come from both parents.
 

kstaven

Crowing
Premium Feather Member
12 Years
Jan 26, 2007
5,927
64
293
BC, Washington Border
With blue eggers you need "both" parents carrying the gene to keep producing good blue eggs. More likely to get green and degrade from there in future generations. Unless you line breed.
 

urbanagrarian

Songster
12 Years
Feb 4, 2007
133
1
141
Massachusetts
Here's the way it works.

Your Easter Egger rooster will have either one or two copies of the blue egg gene which is dominant. If you mate him with hens that do not lay blue eggs there are two possibilities.

If he has one copy of the gene then 50% of the girl chicks he fathers will lay blue or green eggs.

If he has two copies of the blue egg gene then 100% of the girl chicks he fathers will lay blue or green eggs.

So if you use him for breeding you should get lots of fun colored egg layers
 

mangled

Songster
11 Years
12 Years
Jan 25, 2008
1,467
8
196
The Wilds of Western PA
Thanks for the information, everyone.

I'm just looking for some interesting egg colors, and maybe a unique, pretty chicken.


If I can ever get the McGyver-bator going right, we'll see what I can hatch out.

Em
 

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