Egg bound hen

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by BlueMoon-N-Farm, Sep 4, 2014.

  1. BlueMoon-N-Farm

    BlueMoon-N-Farm Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Today is day...8-9? Shes not dead, but I can feel the egg inside her on the top of her body still inside the oviduct I think.
    I've been working on her for two days now, at first I thought it was something else and I never even thought to check her. I know, my fault, but she was acting like she had coccidia. Droopy wings, dihareha...then she got a bit better.
    Now after her butt soaking, calcium tabs, and lubricating massages she is acting a little better, but the egg is still there.
    She is just eight months old and is a new egg layer. Silver grey dorking.
    Any advice?? Is there anything I can do for her?
     
  2. casportpony

    casportpony Team Tube Feeding Captain & Poop Inspector General Premium Member

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    In addition to the calcium, my vet would have me give fluids, lots of them and stick her in a warm bathroom that's full of steam. Do you know how to tube fluids or give them subcutaneously? Tubing is easy and I could walk you through it over the phone.

    -Kathy
     
  3. casportpony

    casportpony Team Tube Feeding Captain & Poop Inspector General Premium Member

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    From: http://beautyofbirds.com/eggbinding.html

    The following are samples of actions that have resolved this problem for some birds (please note: not all hens can be saved, especially if it's critical by the time the problem was discovered and no vet is available or can be reached in time). Egg-bound hens go into profound cardiovascular collapse and may not be able to put in the effort to push the egg out without intervention.
    • Place the bird into a steamy room, such as bathroom with shower on until the bathroom mirrors and windows steam up. Desired temperature: 85-90 degrees Fahrenheit / Humidity: 60%. Place bird on wet towel. The warmth relaxes the hen so that the vent can dilate more allowing the egg to pass.
    • A warm water bath can also be of great help (shallow water, of course, you don't want to drown the hen). This relaxes her muscles and often the hen will pass the egg into the water. Make the water as warm as you would like to take a long soak in.
    • Massage the muscles in that area with olive oil. In many cases, this lead to a successful passing of the egg. Note: there is a risk associated with messaging this area. It could cause the egg inside to break - which is life-threatening. Be very careful! If in doubt, it's always best to have the vet take care of it ...
    • Even if the cause is not hypocalcaemia in this hen’s case it will not hurt her to have more calcium.
    • Applying a personal lubricant, such as KY jelly to her vent may also be helpful.
    • To reduce swelling on her vent, some breeders reported success in applying Preparation H to her vent.
    • Successful Passing of the Egg: Following passing of the egg keep the hen in a warm and quiet area separate from the others, until she is out of shock and back to eating and drinking well.
    • Prevention: Provide bird with high-calorie, high-calcium food to help strengthen future eggs and prevent egg binding. Recommendations for pet bird diet / nutrition.
     
  4. HugHess

    HugHess Chickrack Addict

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    Go BROWNS
  5. casportpony

    casportpony Team Tube Feeding Captain & Poop Inspector General Premium Member

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    From: http://www.vcahospitals.com/main/pe...rticle/animal-health/egg-binding-in-birds/863
    "Critically ill birds are first treated for shock and then attempts are made to treat the egg binding."

    "Treatment varies with how sick the bird is when presented to your veterinarian, as well as the location of the egg and the length of time the bird has been egg bound. Critically ill birds are first treated supportively for shock and then attempts are made to treat the egg binding. Mildly affected birds may respond to supplemental heat, re-hydration with injectable fluids, calcium, and vitamin D-3. Other injectable drugs may help cause the oviduct to contract and expel the egg. If the egg is near the cloacal opening, it might be gently extracted. Eggs that do not pass with drug therapy require treatment that is more aggressive. A needle may need to be placed through the abdomen into the eggshell to aspirate the contents of the egg, causing the shell to collapse. Following this treatment, the empty shell will be pulled out if possible or will usually pass out of the bird within a few days. Failing this, surgery under general anesthetic may be performed to remove the egg or shell fragments".

    -Kathy
     
  6. casportpony

    casportpony Team Tube Feeding Captain & Poop Inspector General Premium Member

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    My vet says that dehydration is usually associated with egg binding.

    -Kathy
     
  7. BlueMoon-N-Farm

    BlueMoon-N-Farm Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I can easily tube her. I'll make sure to get some electrolytes into her and more fluids when my husband gets home to hold her. I've been soaking her every day and keeping her warm. I'll crush up some more calcium tabs and see what happens. I just hope the poor girl ends up making it :(
     

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