Egg Color Genetics

Cimmaron

Chirping
Jul 19, 2018
95
71
81
Montana
Am I correct that the blue gene is dominant? So a white egg layer crossed with a blue egg layer should make a blue egg layer? Would there be any way to tell the heterozygous blue egg from a homozygous one?

I have one cross breed pullet and I need to identify her egg or sell her before I start hatching from my purebreds!
 

nicalandia

Crowing
10 Years
Jul 16, 2009
7,570
2,107
406
Stuck In a Dream
My Coop
My Coop
Am I correct that the blue gene is dominant? So a white egg layer crossed with a blue egg layer should make a blue egg layer? Would there be any way to tell the heterozygous blue egg from a homozygous one?

I have one cross breed pullet and I need to identify her egg or sell her before I start hatching from my purebreds!
Its an incompletely dominant autosomal mutation, that means that O/o+ hens will lay a faded tone of blue as oposed to O/O hens
 

The Moonshiner

Professional Chicken Tender
Nov 17, 2016
4,902
11,126
481
Missouri
Its an incompletely dominant autosomal mutation, that means that O/o+ hens will lay a faded tone of blue as oposed to O/O hens
Not gonna say that isn't true but it isn't so easy to see.
If you only have one hen laying what would you compare to to know if it's lighter or darker?
Different hens can also lay different shades of blue so how would you know if a lighter egg comes from a O/o+ hen that would lay a darker shade if O/O or if it's a O/O hen that just lays a lighter shade of blue.
Also blue eggs can change shade a bit if a hen is in a heavy laying cycle compared to when they're laying sporadically.
If you throw 6 O/o+ hens with 6 O/O hens you may be able to pick out a few correctly but I don't believe you can tell for certain which are which.
 

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