Egg laying questions

Discussion in 'Chicken Behaviors and Egglaying' started by buckabucka, Feb 19, 2012.

  1. buckabucka

    buckabucka Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jan 13, 2010
    Fairfield, Maine
    My Coop
    My first batch of chickens was born in May, and they continued laying through their first winter (without added light), which I understand is typical.
    I bought some pullets this winter, some born in July, some in August. The July pullets just started laying, but not those born in August. I'm sure they will be starting up soon.
    My question is this: if a pullet was too young to start laying in its first winter, does it lay through the second winter, or should I expect to see them molting by then? Or is this more a question of breed?
    Not that it really matters to me if they lay next winter or not. I am just curious about what to expect, since I have never had summer-born pullets.
     
  2. Fred's Hens

    Fred's Hens Chicken Obsessed Premium Member

    Time will certainly tell. It's good to remember that chickens sometimes have mini moults a couple of times throughout the year. It is also hard to speculate about how they will react to next year's diminishing light of fall/winter, in terms of their egg laying. I've had sex-links and commercial hens that I would be confident saying they'll lay next winter, if they were the birds hatched as you describe.

    But, it needs to be said, I've also had other breeds, who aren't the prolific layers in the first place, who were hatched in July and August and absolutely shut down the following winter. Sorry that sounds like saying either they will or they won't is possible. Well...... come to think of it,..... Yeah, that's pretty much what I'm saying.[​IMG]
     
  3. buckabucka

    buckabucka Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Thanks! I know there is really no way to know until then. It's just that I know the capability to produce eggs is there, so if they take the first and the second winter off, it seems like those hens might be more productive each spring in later years, if that makes sense.
    Aren't they born with a set number of eggs to give off?
    I guess I'm wondering if there is a disadvantage to summer hatching.
     

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