Eggs kept out of incubator

Discussion in 'Incubating & Hatching Eggs' started by clyde_97, Feb 7, 2011.

  1. clyde_97

    clyde_97 Out Of The Brooder

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    Jan 16, 2011
    I get to pick up my eggs on thursday but i dont get my incubator until saturday,Will my eggs still be alive or should i not bother getting them?

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  2. perolane

    perolane Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Usually you'll want to put eggs in the incubator no more than 10 days after lay....some have had hatches with eggs held up to 2 weeks.

    Good luck! [​IMG]
     
  3. clyde_97

    clyde_97 Out Of The Brooder

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    Jan 16, 2011
    Thanks
    I cant belive you have 300 quail!
     
  4. Ridgerunner

    Ridgerunner Chicken Obsessed

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    You should be fine. I suggest you check out this article. I read it to refresh myself before I incubate, plus it has some good information about storing eggs for incubation. Don't get too hung up on keeping the temperature exactly in that range, just do the best you can on that and keep them out of extreme temperatures.

    Texas A&M Incubation site
    http://gallus.tamu.edu/library/extpublications/b6092.pdf

    Good luck and welcome to the incubator adventure.
     
  5. Davaroo

    Davaroo Poultry Crank

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    Quote:Ideally, you would get your incubator running and stable, BEFORE you got any eggs. Getting eggs before is what we call the "Trust and Pray" method of incubation.
    If you have a choice, have any new incubator running for several days, even a week, before you set eggs. This goes for incubators you haul out of storage or purchase from someone else, too.

    Eggs remain viable for 7-14 days after lay, if stored properly. This means a temperature of around 55 degrees F, 60%-70% Rh and with daily turning. There are many exceptions to this, as people are always hatching eggs under the most extreme variations on this. But that is the rule of thumb.
     

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