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Eggtopsy

Discussion in 'Incubating & Hatching Eggs' started by misserink, Dec 14, 2015.

  1. misserink

    misserink Out Of The Brooder

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    Sep 24, 2014
    I had 4 copper maran eggs that were late to hatch days after the others. After day 25 I did an Eggtopsy and found they were all mal positioned, had unabsorbed yolks and a greenish hue to the abdominals. There was no odor, but I sliced one open and a bunch of green fluid poured out. Does anyone know what this is and how I can prevent it next time. I had three other eggs that hatched fine. 1 Silkie, 1 Favorelle, and 1 maran.

    Any info is greatly appreciated. [​IMG]
     
  2. ChickenCanoe

    ChickenCanoe Chicken Obsessed

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    Could be so many things. You may want to check this link.
    https://www.backyardchickens.com/a/hatchability-problem-analysis
    In a nutshell
    Malpositions could be
    1. Eggs set small end up or in horizontal position.
    2. Inadequate or improper turning.
    3. High or low incubator temperature.
    4. High humidity.
    5. Old breeders.
    6. Round-shaped eggs or very large eggs.
    7. Nutritional deficiencies, especially vitamin A and vitamin B12.
    8. Eggs handled or stored improperly.
    9. Retarded development.
    Unabsorbed yolk could be
    1. Inadequate turning, resulting in decreased embryonic membrane development and nutrient absorption.
    2. Humidity too high during incubation or after transfer.
    3. Incubator temperature too low.
    4. Hatcher temperature too high.
    5. Eggs chilled (e.g., at transfer).
    6. Nutritional deficiencies.
    7. Heredity.
    8. Embryological development accident.
    9. Breeder diseases.
    10. Inadequate ventilation.
    11. Prolonged egg storage.

    Possible nutritional deficiencies in the breeder flock a month prior to hatch should never be ignored.
     
    1 person likes this.
  3. misserink

    misserink Out Of The Brooder

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    Sep 24, 2014
    I had purchased these eggs from someone local and sometime during incubation, we had a 4 hour power outage. I've never seen that color green before and was curious if it was normal or some type of bacterial infection. This was my first time incubating eggs not of my own flock and I know bacteria and e.coli can be an issue in these situations.
     
  4. ChickenCanoe

    ChickenCanoe Chicken Obsessed

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    Nov 23, 2010
    St. Louis, MO
    Bacteria would usually cause early death of the embryo, not at the hatching stage.
     
  5. Sally Sunshine

    Sally Sunshine Cattywampus Angel <straightens Halo> Premium Member

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    I agree with cc on this, however the looks of this do tend to lead to Omphalitis, which could have been caused by a bacterium that enters through the porous egg shell. Unfortunately, incubation conditions are ideal for breeding bacteria as well as incubating eggs. I actually had researched this at one point... have a look... The only prevention IF it is clean handling/turning, and cleaning that bator. sometimes people let that water in the bator get nasty with mold. thats not good either.

    Here is an article I wrote for helping others

    [/B]

    AND one last thing KEEPING MOLD OUT OF THE BATOR post #1644
     
  6. Sally Sunshine

    Sally Sunshine Cattywampus Angel <straightens Halo> Premium Member

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    OH!! and welcome to BYC!!! [​IMG] congrats on your hatch too!!!
     

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