Examples of Incomplete Dominant Chicken Genes

CaramelKittey

Crowing
Feb 15, 2019
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Hi all! I seem to be drawing a blank on this one. I know mottled genetics, Silver/Gold genetics in roosters, dun/khaki/mauve and BBS genetics are all example of incomplete dominance, but are there any others? I'm trying to get as many examples as I can for a project I'm working on, but I'm really drawing a blank here. 😅
Figured this could be a helpful thread for those confusing incomplete dominance and co-dominance as well.

Thank you in advance!
 

Feathercrazie

Chirping
Jun 3, 2021
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Hi all! I seem to be drawing a blank on this one. I know mottled genetics, Silver/Gold genetics in roosters, dun/khaki/mauve and BBS genetics are all example of incomplete dominance, but are there any others? I'm trying to get as many examples as I can for a project I'm working on, but I'm really drawing a blank here. 😅
Figured this could be a helpful thread for those confusing incomplete dominance and co-dominance as well.

Thank you in advance!
Mottled is recessive, although I have found some indicators that mottled will affect some birds with only one mottled gene. When a bird with a double laced gene is given one mottled gene the offspring will usually be single laced. Seems to cause the black to congregate at the end of the feather. There are other recessive genes that cause a similar effect, such as lavender which causes a mostly black bird with only one dose when bred to almost any other color or pattern.
 

CaramelKittey

Crowing
Feb 15, 2019
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New Jersey
Mottled is recessive, although I have found some indicators that mottled will affect some birds with only one mottled gene. When a bird with a double laced gene is given one mottled gene the offspring will usually be single laced. Seems to cause the black to congregate at the end of the feather. There are other recessive genes that cause a similar effect, such as lavender which causes a mostly black bird with only one dose when bred to almost any other color or pattern.
Thank you! I always thought mottled was recessive but I'm starting to see more and more evidence that it is actually incomplete dominant. 😁 I didn't know that about the double laced and mottled gene producing single lacing, that's fascinating!
 

Amer

Advocate of Shiloh
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Nov 8, 2017
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Mottled is recessive, although I have found some indicators that mottled will affect some birds with only one mottled gene. When a bird with a double laced gene is given one mottled gene the offspring will usually be single laced. Seems to cause the black to congregate at the end of the feather. There are other recessive genes that cause a similar effect, such as lavender which causes a mostly black bird with only one dose when bred to almost any other color or pattern.
Mottling is recessive to nonmottling but there are multiple mottling alleles on the mottling locus which could be considered incompletely dominant with each other.
All the examples I can think of are co-dominant (meaning both genes are shown but not mixed together.) I think blue, golden, and dun cover the bases.
 
May 21, 2017
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Mottled is recessive, although I have found some indicators that mottled will affect some birds with only one mottled gene. When a bird with a double laced gene is given one mottled gene the offspring will usually be single laced. Seems to cause the black to congregate at the end of the feather. There are other recessive genes that cause a similar effect, such as lavender which causes a mostly black bird with only one dose when bred to almost any other color or pattern.
What you’re seeing is the result of the extended black under the mottling and lavender, not the actual recessive genes themselves. Crossing a black mottled bird with a double laced one will give you chicks with the same phenotype as a black x double laced cross. Solid lavender is black with two recessive lavender genes, so, in first generation crosses, lavender will act the same as black.
 

nicalandia

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Mottling is recessive to nonmottling but there are multiple mottling alleles on the mottling locus which could be considered incompletely dominant with each other.
All the examples I can think of are co-dominant (meaning both genes are shown but not mixed together.) I think blue, golden, and dun cover the bases.
Blue, Silver and Dun are incomplete dominant, Dominant white is Codominant..


Incomplete dominance= Blending of the traits
Codominance = Two genotypes are expressed
 

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