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Falling Asleep

Discussion in 'Quail' started by PoptartTheQuail, Oct 12, 2014.

  1. PoptartTheQuail

    PoptartTheQuail Out Of The Brooder

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    I just got a pair of button quails and they're super scared of me, and sometimes, they'll stop whatever they're doing at the moment and just sort of close they're eyes and maybe rock a little. Is this normal? Also there is a big clump of poo on the male's foot, so that he limps on that foot. Any tips as to how to remove it?
     
  2. SeptemberQuail

    SeptemberQuail Chillin' With My Peeps

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    If they're young and 'sleeping' during the middle of the day, that usually isn't a good sign. I've found that when I have sick quail, they'll go somewhere in the corner, or inside their house and just lie down, and close their eyes. So I believe somethings up. Seeing that they're untamed, I'd suggest to keep observing them often because handling won't be very easy and it'll obviously stress them out. Take note of any abnormal activities (e.g. mucus from nose, head shaking, lethargic, etc.) and research or ask around BYC for advice.

    Annnnd the poop on the foot. I hate it when that happens, especially when the quail is fidgety and refuses to be held for long periods of time.
    I suggest getting a container (like a cat litter tray [no don't use a used cat litter tray hehe]), filling it with warm water and putting the male in the container. The water should only be covering the poop on his foot, and should not be touching his body because quail can't swim and don't do well when wet.

    Leave him there for a while (keep an eye on him in case he has ideas of escaping or flying away) and the poop should eventually soften up and break off itself. How long depends on how hard and big the poop is. Keep him near his female buddy/the place they live in because she'll want to know what's happening to her buddy, and he wouldn't want to be separated for too long.
    Most cases, the poop won't come off easily and may require a bit of persuasion. I've had to use pliers to break apart poop on my japanese quail. I can't imagine what it'd be like with button quail, but hopefully it should break apart itself in the water.

    Another way to remove poop is suggested here:


    For future references, use aspen or pine shavings as bedding (the poop falls to the bottom) and clean the cage regularly to make sure they don't get poop on their feet again. Have fun! [​IMG]
     
  3. PoptartTheQuail

    PoptartTheQuail Out Of The Brooder

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    Thank you! That was very helpful! They're adults, but other than falling asleep for a few seconds to a minute at times seem active, so I'll keep careful watch of them. Thanks again!:)
     
  4. GrandmaBird

    GrandmaBird Chillin' With My Peeps

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    be sure they are getting the high protein fed. 25-30% if laying and 20%+ if not. I keep mine on 28% year round and increase the protein with hard boiled chicken egg in the spring and summer when the hen is laying. Be sure they have grit and oyster shell as well. Sounds like bored buttons. lol they should be okay. Good Luck!
     
  5. PoptartTheQuail

    PoptartTheQuail Out Of The Brooder

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    Okay, thank you! They have 24% protein in their feed at the moment, and I have calcium-fortified grit. Do you think that along with crushed egg shells will do in place of oyster shell?
     
  6. SeptemberQuail

    SeptemberQuail Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Yep. I just feed my quail the egg shell that we get after boiling eggs alongside shell grit. They'll eat any eggshell: chicken egg shell, quail egg shell, etc. (They don't seem to recognize their own eggs when its crushed). Oyster shell is just another additional way of supplying calcium for quails; it isn't an absolute must, but it is a good source of calcium.

    A variety in their diet would be good for their overall health as well. Don't forget to feed them veggies such as broccoli, lettuce, spinach, alfafa, etc. Mine enjoy the occasional watermelon, and they absolutely love mealworms (another great source of protein). Maybe you could bribe them with some treats to earn their trust? [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Oct 14, 2014
  7. PoptartTheQuail

    PoptartTheQuail Out Of The Brooder

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    They love broccoli and seem to have fun tossing it around. At first they were hesitant about the mealworms, but once they got a taste, they were crazy about them! They are such cute little birds to watch. Still need to think up names for them!
     
  8. PoptartTheQuail

    PoptartTheQuail Out Of The Brooder

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    Sorry one more question. Grit should always be available to them? As I do not have oyster shells at the moment, can I crush up a human calcium supplement and add it to the grit. and if so, how much should I add?
     
  9. SeptemberQuail

    SeptemberQuail Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Haha, naming is fun. c: I named some of my quail when they were chicks, and my other ones were named once they fully feathered.
    For my quails: My white roo is called Prince, because every time I pick him up he always stands on my hand with one foot in-front of the other and raises his chin like some noble prince. My black-feathered female is named Pepper II (cause she looks just like her mum and the colour of black pepper), one light brown one is called Willow, the younger light brown one called Egglantine, and my white female is named Buttons because the way she behaved reminded me of a button quail for some reason.

    Yes, grit should be available to them at all times if possible. Its more important for the female because they lose a lot of calcium from producing one egg, and birds need grit to help them digest their food since they don't have teeth. A few days without a calcium supplement is alright, they'll survive, but its best to keep them on a constant calcium supplement when you can. I've read on here before about people feeding human calcium supplement for chickens. Some say its alright, some suggest not to do it because its not meant for fowl and is expensive in general. For a short period of time, I'd say it'd be alright to just crush it and sprinkle it into their regular feed or put it in a separate bowl, however I'd like a second opinion on this. You could also use cuttlebone. Although, my quail didn't seem interested it in it, so we ended up crushing it and mixing it into their feed.

    I'm not sure how much they need though. I don't believe there is a specific amount. When I was doing agriculture as an elective and was helping take care of the chooks, there was one feeder full of regular pellets, and another just full of shell grit. My teacher said that the chickens know when to eat it and when they need more, so I presume the same would go for quails.
     
  10. Mtn Margie

    Mtn Margie Overrun With Chickens

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    Grit is not the same as calcium. Grit should be crushed granite or sand, bird grit, available to all of the birds. You do not want to feed your males extra calcium, just the hens. So the hens need a separate source of egg shell or oyster shell to pick at when they need it. The males won't usually mess with the dish.
     

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