First Rooster attack

CarolJ

Dogwood Trace Farm
8 Years
Jun 3, 2011
2,003
141
173
Middle Tennessee
I went into the run awhile ago to get an egg that a hen had laid on the ground, and our dominant EE rooster attacked me! I saw him coming, and I kicked him. He regrouped and came at me again - I'd kick - and he'd charge at me again - I kept kicking him each time as I backed towards the door. There was no way I was going to let him get to me! Once I was out of the run, I got my net and went back in. Thank goodness my small brooder pen is empty. He is now in solitary confinement which is where he will stay until he sells on Craigslist. Although my husband has offered to dispatch him as soon as he gets home from work. I have 3 granddaughters - and if he'll attack me, he'd attack one of them which I absolutely will not let happen.
 
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ChicKat

Free Ranging
Premium Feather Member
10 Years
Sorry to hear you were attacked.

Your rooster was protecting your flock---only trouble he was protecting from you---(and very effectively). Good luck selling on Craigs List. I hope he gets a good new home. Be sure to tell the buyer about his tendency to be overly protective.

Very pretty egg basket in your avatar!!!!
 
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speckledhen

Intentional Solitude
Premium Feather Member
14 Years
Feb 3, 2007
79,247
13,901
1,236
Blue Ridge Mtns. of North Georgia
I agree, beautiful egg basket in your avatar, Carol!

I'm going to say something and it will probably be misunderstood: he's too stupid to keep and you certainly don't want that "stupid gene" being passed on to his sons. I'm dead serious. I've found that the more intelligent roosters know that the humans who bring food, water and treats are not the enemy. I don't breed the ones who attack their keepers.

And you're right about the kids--roosters, even the normally easygoing ones, become very nervous around small children, mainly because of their manner of movement and play, which is loud and erratic. They put roosters on edge, even my sweet lovebug roosters.

Why put up with a human-aggressive rooster when you can have one like my Isaac, who does his duty to the max, and is completely easygoing and friendly?

Check out the video in this post for proof of what a rooster can be like:

https://www.backyardchickens.com/t/384349/sdwd/14610#post_8894682

Another video from photobucket: http://s673.photobucket.com/albums/vv95/Mtnviewpoultry/Video Clips/?action=view&current=DSCN5537.mp4

Just make sure you tell the new owner, if they don't intend to eat him for dinner, that he's been a problem. It's only fair to do so.
 
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CarolJ

Dogwood Trace Farm
8 Years
Jun 3, 2011
2,003
141
173
Middle Tennessee
Thanks for the compliments on the egg basket! I love all the egg colors!

I agree completely that the rooster has to go! As soon as he charged me, he sealed his fate. He was put on Craigslist as soon as I got back inside - and we already have found him a new home that he'll go to tomorrow. New owner is aware of his behavior. Thanks!
 

CarolJ

Dogwood Trace Farm
8 Years
Jun 3, 2011
2,003
141
173
Middle Tennessee
Yes - thanks for the links to the videos. I don't foresee hugging and kissing any of my chickens - but I DO enjoy being with them.
 

speckledhen

Intentional Solitude
Premium Feather Member
14 Years
Feb 3, 2007
79,247
13,901
1,236
Blue Ridge Mtns. of North Georgia
Well, that was the teenage "cuddle-izer" who was visiting in the video-she was quite enamoured of Isaac that weekend.

I give Ike a chest scratch every day at roost time, but hugging and kissing the rooster isn't on the schedule, LOL. I do like to be able to handle my roosters when needed and I expect not to be attacked by any of them, no matter what I do with their hens.

The Blue Orp in my avatar is also calm and easygoing and it's a good thing, too, since his hens are ridiculous drama queens and screech at the top of their lungs if you reach to pick them up. He's about 13-14 lbs, so we cannot have him be a snot-rag. His sons are the same, just good even-tempered males.

So happy you found a home for yours quickly. I had one Delaware rooster who became aggressive as he matured, starting with biting, then flogging shoes; it escalated until he attacked my DH by flying off the roost at him. I told him to throw him in a cage we use for broodies and the next day, we processed him, though I already had a home lined up for him. We did not want that temperament passed on, especially when the breed was making a comeback and quality was important as well as quantity.
 

Courts Clucks

In the Brooder
7 Years
Apr 29, 2012
82
4
31
Richards, MO
I have a 2 yr old niece with downs syndrome. So every animal on my property has to be Sophia-tolerant. Three of my boys passed the test and the other six are going to a new home this week. None of them were crazy enough to attack (that would lead to sudden death at my house) but since she is their size, attitudes were shown. Of the 3 staying, one ignores her and walks away (much like my cat), one follows her around waiting for food to drop (much like my dogs), and the other one is an attention-hound (though he grumbles and grouches like an old man). So I totally understand the walking papers you issued lol.
 

Time-Out

Songster
8 Years
Jun 29, 2011
1,170
46
153
The Peak District, UK
It's always a difficult path to tread, especially with large chickens. I have a Sebright cockerel who became ratty as his hormones kicked in. He would attacked anything new I put out, including the little green grit dish. When he moved to the stable, he would attack my other half's boots, but only when he wasn't looking. He wasn't stupid lol. After a while, a Barnevelder cockerel decided he'd be boss and put the Sebright in his place. Since then, he's been back to the sweetest little thing ever; trying to snuggle into my sweater, sitting on my shoulder and grooming my hair...

The Barnevelder, on the other hand, terrorizes the girls, but does nothing to humans. He just runs around your feet doing a turkey impression.

I'm glad I didn't get rid of the Sebright on the first sign of aggressiveness. He's not breeding material anyway, so that was never considered.
 

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