Flock management Question

BethMatt

In the Brooder
Apr 10, 2015
99
3
48
We recently added 7 new members to our flock, same age as our flock. Things are NOT going well to say the least, we tried keeping them separate, but only have one coop, one run & one area for foraging, It has brought the worst our in our young bantam rooster, & at night, it is Pandamonioum to say the least, some of the new chics (whom I'm sure have never been "cooped") are flying into the windows, walls, hanging onto things for dear life, they scream & peck at each other, getting our girls all stressed out & fighting each other (something they have never done, because of being rasied as peeps together..) Our flock will not let the newbie's eat or drink before they've had their fill...can anyone offer some advice or suggestions? we are so stressed over this & not sure what to do
idunno.gif
 

bobbi-j

Enabler
11 Years
Mar 15, 2010
16,118
34,424
1,112
On the MN prairie.
Sorry things aren't going well. How old are the new ones? The original ones? How much space do you have? Do you have any hiding places for the new ones? How long have they been together? How were you keeping them separated the coop and run? Do you have more roosters besides your bantam? This is all information that would be helpful in giving you some answers. From what little you did share, my first thought is that they need more space,
 

Dandelioness

Songster
5 Years
May 27, 2014
398
83
131
East Central MN
The best way is always quarantining the new flock members, then introducing them in a way that they can see but not attack each other. For example, I have a portable pen that my new members will get to be in as the regular flock will get to know them through the chicken wire as they free range. But of course, sometimes we just need to make the best of the situation before us.

My first thoughts are - can you rig some kind of roof and roosts to keep the rain off the new birds in the run, and put a partition in the run so the chickens can see and get used to each other?

If not, you may consider adding another feeder and waterer so the new ones stay well nourished until the established flock members accept them. I try to have a place at the trough at least for everyone to be able to stand next to or across from each other.

Hiding places are always a good idea, too. A board at an angle against the wall, more roosts, a dog kennel, anything the less dominant or new birds can use to get away from the more aggressive or dominant members.

Good luck! And like the poster above said, if we had a little more info we could be a little more helpful. :)
 

BethMatt

In the Brooder
Apr 10, 2015
99
3
48
Sorry things aren't going well. How old are the new ones? The original ones? How much space do you have? Do you have any hiding places for the new ones? How long have they been together? How were you keeping them separated the coop and run? Do you have more roosters besides your bantam? This is all information that would be helpful in giving you some answers. From what little you did share, my first thought is that they need more space,


Ours are 6wks, the new ones are from 4wks to 12wks, they have a 6x8 coop, & 10x14 run & a 20x24 outter yard. They are all together but the little ones can get under the coop if they need to run. It's been almost 3 days. We have 1 other barred rock rooster 6wks old.
 

bobbi-j

Enabler
11 Years
Mar 15, 2010
16,118
34,424
1,112
On the MN prairie.
Ours are 6wks, the new ones are from 4wks to 12wks, they have a 6x8 coop, & 10x14 run & a 20x24 outter yard. They are all together but the little ones can get under the coop if they need to run. It's been almost 3 days. We have 1 other barred rock rooster 6wks old.
One other question - how many did you start out with before adding the seven?
 

BethMatt

In the Brooder
Apr 10, 2015
99
3
48
We had 6, 2 Roos & 4 hens.


I was just out with them & One of the new ones droppings, are now a concern for me, on top of it all here is the color of her droppings, could you help with this also? I'm sorry I feel so needy! :/
700
 

bobbi-j

Enabler
11 Years
Mar 15, 2010
16,118
34,424
1,112
On the MN prairie.
So you have 13 chickens, 3 of which are cockerels. That could be a potential problem in as they mature. There may or may not be fighting, and your hens will likely be run ragged. Personally, I think you need a bigger coop for all those chickens. I don't know where you live, but if it's in a colder climate where they will want to spend time indoors during cold weather (or inclement weather any time of year) they will definitely be too crowded.

Can't help you with the poop problem. Does the bird seem healthy and active otherwise?
 

BethMatt

In the Brooder
Apr 10, 2015
99
3
48
So you have 13 chickens, 3 of which are cockerels. That could be a potential problem in as they mature. There may or may not be fighting, and your hens will likely be run ragged. Personally, I think you need a bigger coop for all those chickens. I don't know where you live, but if it's in a colder climate where they will want to spend time indoors during cold weather (or inclement weather any time of year) they will definitely be too crowded. 

Can't help you with the poop problem. Does the bird seem healthy and active otherwise?


Yes right now she seems fine, I'll have to consider re-homing some before I can get a bigger coop. We plan on getting rid of one or both Roos. Thanks so much for the help.
 

chickengeorgeto

Crowing
7 Years
Dec 25, 2012
8,047
4,227
431
Big Bend of the Tennessee River's Right Bank.
We recently added 7 new members to our flock, same age as our flock. Things are NOT going well to say the least, we tried keeping them separate, but only have one coop, one run & one area for foraging, It has brought the worst our in our young bantam rooster, & at night, it is Pandamonioum to say the least, some of the new chics (whom I'm sure have never been "cooped") are flying into the windows, walls, hanging onto things for dear life, they scream & peck at each other, getting our girls all stressed out & fighting each other (something they have never done, because of being rasied as peeps together..) Our flock will not let the newbie's eat or drink before they've had their fill...can anyone offer some advice or suggestions? we are so stressed over this & not sure what to do
idunno.gif
Let the older birds eat and drank their fill because that is what the pecking order is all about. ie. the unequal division of resources. No species does this better than chickens, not even humans. Bed time is the worst time of all. Observe and try not to intervene unless someone's' wellbeing is in danger.
 

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