Fryers, broilers, roasters, I'M CONFUSED!

backintime

Songster
11 Years
Apr 7, 2008
212
2
131
Northern Wisconsin
Is there some sort of time-table for when a Cornish X bird goes from fryer to broiler to roaster (week by week)? Is there much difference in meat quality and tenderness between these stages, or is it more an issue of the size of the finished bird?
 

uhuh555

Songster
10 Years
Oct 18, 2009
159
1
109
Delton
We usually consider live weight: 2.5 to 3 pounds = cornish game; 4 to 8 pounds = fryer; 9+ pounds = roaster or broiler. Others may have different weight ranges--you just pick the one you like--it doesn't matter they taste great any ol' way their cooked reguardless of size.
 

petrelline

Songster
10 Years
Feb 13, 2009
235
3
124
Los Gatos, CA
Here's a doc about the traditional meanings of the categories in heritage chicken: http://www.albc-usa.org/documents/cookingwheritagechicken.pdf

The
interesting part:
There are 4 traditional chicken meat classes: broiler, fryer, roaster and fowl. The traditional broiler age
range was from 7 to 12 weeks, and carcass weight from 1 to 2 1/2 lbs. (Squab broilers would be youngest and
smallest of these, typically Leghorn cockerels about 3/4 to 1 pound dressed.) The next age and weight group
was called the fryer. Traditional fryer age range was from 14 to 20 weeks, and carcass weight from 2 1/2 to 4
lbs. Traditional roaster age range was from 5 to 12 months, and carcass weight from 4 to 8 pounds. Most
roasters were butchered between 6 and 9 months. Hens and roosters 12 months and older were called “fowl” or
“stewing fowl” signifying that slow moist cooking methods were required.

Modern cornish X hybrids obviously grow a lot faster than heritage chickens so the timetables are different, but the weights are roughly still the same for the categories.​
 

SteveH

Songster
10 Years
Nov 10, 2009
3,392
13
191
West/Central IL
Quote:
Modern cornish X hybrids obviously grow a lot faster than heritage chickens so the timetables are different, but the weights are roughly still the same for the categories.

Thanks for that info pettreline . My family only called them fryers , roasters , and stewing chickens . I always assumed roasters and broilers were the same thing .
 

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