Galvanized Steel coop

Discussion in 'Coop & Run - Design, Construction, & Maintenance' started by DesertBrahma, Sep 29, 2015.

  1. DesertBrahma

    DesertBrahma Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I am going to be getting a 8x10 galvanized steel shed this weekend. I need some advice on how to modify it for good ventilation for New Mexico summers, and keeping it warm in the winter. Or rather not drafty during the winter. I want to put some hinges, and larches so I can open and close which ever vents I need to. I'm also going to put brackets for the roosts. I'm going to put hardware cloth, and a floor in the coop. I'm going to use pressure treated 4x4s for the foundation, and put 2x4s for the floor joists, and put pressure treated plywood with linoleum on top as the floor. Do I need to put hardware cloth, or chicken wire under it? Also what's the best way to cut the metal so I can still keep it in good shape for me to use as "window" vents. Also can I put something on the metal to keep it from rusting? I really want to start putting it together and get my girls and boy in it. Any input is welcome. Thanks for the advice in advance.
     
  2. Caleb999

    Caleb999 Chillin' With My Peeps

    I would use a reciprocating saw to cut the metal. For the floor, how thick is the plywood. If it's over half inch, you should be good. Good luck with your coop!
     
  3. DesertBrahma

    DesertBrahma Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I plan on using a saws all to cut the areas that I need. I'm going to cut it before I put them on. Then I can add the hardware where I need it.I know I'll have to add some wood in a few places to strengthen the areas.
     
  4. chiques chicks

    chiques chicks Chillin' With My Peeps

    Any good metal paint should help protect from rust.

    Add ventilation high so the heat and moisture can escape in summer.

    Don't close off all the high ventilation in the winter, the moisture will rise, you need it to escape. Moisture and cold is bad, chickens can generally handle cold.

    Not sure how cold your winters get, but mine handle sub freezing temperatures for weeks in a dry coop. Provide shade for the summer and lots of ventilation, heat can build up in buildings and heat is worse than cold. Chickens don't sweat like humans.
     
  5. DesertBrahma

    DesertBrahma Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I live in southern NM. It can and has gotten down to single digits in temp. I was planning on using some old carpet to cover the vents on top loosely. Right now it's still getting up to the 90s during the day and down in the 60s during the night. I have Dark Brahma chickens that can handle the cold but not the heat as much. I'm going to place this shed so it has good afternoon shade so it doesn't heat up as bad as it could. They'll also have the old funky coop I built when I first got them. I'm estimating spending about $500 for everything unless I just go with a wooden shed for the same price.
     
  6. chiques chicks

    chiques chicks Chillin' With My Peeps

    Brahma should have no issue at those temperatures.

    I'm in Pennsylvania, some winters it doesn't get out of the teens for a couple days. Below zero happens on occasion. My coops are wood and there is a 3 inch gap on both sides under the eaves. There is also a 1x8 foot for open window and a 2x8 foot foot window with a flap that doesn't close tight. I keep no water in my coop. The birds survive, although they do get some frostbitten combs. All the vents are located so wind doesn't blow over the floor or roosts.

    The openings are covered with ½x1 cage wire.

    They really are hardy animals!

    Given a choice, DME process, same size, I prefer wood. Easier to modify without a trip for stitches, slightly more insulating, and absorbs more sound. Just my opinion. Most inexpensive steel sheds I've seen aren't vary sturdy. I was just looking for a she'd for a couple goats and realized I am build a wooden one better and stronger than any of the inexpensive metal sheds on the market for about the same money.
     
  7. DesertBrahma

    DesertBrahma Chillin' With My Peeps

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    We get some nasty winds at times here. I'm going with a wooden base, and floor so it's a little more sturdy than the metal floor frame they provide. I have looked into building a wooden shed but can't afford it. Supplies would cost me more than $400 around here. I've also looked into the pre built sheds and those are way out of my budget.
     
  8. 123RedBeard

    123RedBeard Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Sawzall can use a hacksaw metal cutting blade ... Drill a few holes in a line to get started ...

    Galvinized metal has its own coating ... Kinda greyish color ... Will probably take fifty years to rust through in Southern NM ... Are you around Las Cruces?

    Have you thought of a hoop coop? Maybe put a few rows of metal roofing (either painted or galvinized) sideways on the top for shade ... Summer is gonna be harder for them to deal with than winter ... I'll be in El Paso tomorrow ...
     
  9. PeppyLaRoo

    PeppyLaRoo Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Metal cutting blade for a circular works best without the vibration of sawzall or jigsaw. It is loud and eye protection a must. Side grider with metal cutting disk works good too.
     
  10. DesertBrahma

    DesertBrahma Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I have a Sawzall, and a jigsaw well and a hacksaw, but that stays with my hunting gear for processing meat. Works well when you have to cut certain bones. Not to be gross or anything. I do have metal blades for my sawzall though. I'm going to try and get my friend to help me. I have so many projects going right now, but my chickies need a bigger home. I'm almost done with 1 project and this one will be added to my list. I'm trying to get everything planned out before I start it so I can have it done that much quicker, and better. Ok here's another question. Can I put plastic over most of the "windows" during winter time, since I'm going to be having 3 of them? I'm going to cut 1 in the top of both doors, and 1 in the side wall. The side wall one will be the biggest at 3'×5' the windows in the doors are going to be 4"×5" plus 2 vents front and back in the gable areas. Yes I'm trying to keep it as cool as possible during summer time. Oh I'm also down in the Tularosa Basin. I've chosen the shadiest location in the backyard for this. I know 4 Brahmas don't need an 8x10 shed but I'm thinking of expanding my flock next year.
     

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