General curiousity

chickencuddler94

In the Brooder
Oct 25, 2021
2
21
21
I'm a new chicken owner and while I did research before purchasing a couple of Easter Egger chickens this weekend, I still have questions about them.
The person I got them from says they're between 12-14 weeks and when I asked approximately when they would lay, she told me, "I don't know I've had some lay as late as 40 weeks." Among research, some have said 20-ish weeks. Can anyone please help give a timeline? Also, I'm finding answers saying this breed is broody and other answers saying that it isn't common. Which is usually the case?
I apologize if these questions seem so silly, but this is new to my family and me and having answers from experienced people would be nice!
Thank you
 

Ursuline Chick

Chicken Outlaw
Premium Feather Member
Jul 21, 2017
6,754
40,084
1,092
NOLA
:frow Welcome from New Orleans. All hens are different when it comes to things like when they lay their first egg to when or if they become broody. Some breeds are more predictable, others not so much. @Kiki @casportpony @Overo Mare are all good resources as are many others here at BYC. (too long a list to mention them all). So you have come to the right place. I hope your hens start laying soon, and you enjoy BYC.
 

Flover

Chirping
Oct 24, 2021
36
103
61
I'm a new chicken owner and while I did research before purchasing a couple of Easter Egger chickens this weekend, I still have questions about them.
The person I got them from says they're between 12-14 weeks and when I asked approximately when they would lay, she told me, "I don't know I've had some lay as late as 40 weeks." Among research, some have said 20-ish weeks. Can anyone please help give a timeline? Also, I'm finding answers saying this breed is broody and other answers saying that it isn't common. Which is usually the case?
I apologize if these questions seem so silly, but this is new to my family and me and having answers from experienced people would be nice!
Thank you
All of mine have started at around 16-20 weeks. Depends on a lot of factors: the amount of daylight hours, breeds in the mix, and a lot more things. In my experience, EEs (hatchery EEs) tend to not go broody. I keep around 15-20 EEs. I really like to randomly hatch, so that's that.

Most hatchery EEs nowadays are Easter Eggers crossed back to Easter Eggers. The new ones tend to have Cream Crested Legbar in them. I wouldn't think there is such thing as a "show quality" Easter Egger since they sum up to be a mutt.
 

Flover

Chirping
Oct 24, 2021
36
103
61
Correct. EEs are mixed breeds at best and mutts at worst. There is no way to get them to reliably breed true, so they will never be accepted as a showable breed
Thank you. That's what I thought, but hatcherys can really be confusing. They just seem to really like to add to their collection of mutts. Not sure why they would breed toward that direction. Maybe they are looking for something fresh and exciting? Or something that is dual purpose? But if that was the case, I would really wonder why they would try to re-invent the wheel when it works perfectly fine. Not sure honestly.
 

JacinLarkwell

Crossing the Road
Mar 19, 2020
15,922
32,170
861
South-Eastern Montana
Thank you. That's what I thought, but hatcherys can really be confusing. They just seem to really like to add to their collection of mutts. Not sure why they would breed toward that direction. Maybe they are looking for something fresh and exciting? Or something that is dual purpose? But if that was the case, I would really wonder why they would try to re-invent the wheel when it works perfectly fine. Not sure honestly.
People in general appear to like and go towards something new, that they can have and others won't (that's why exotic breeds are so in currently). So a new "breed" at a hatchery can boost sales
 

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