1. If this is your first time on BYC, we suggest you start with one of these three options:
    Raising Chickens Chicken Coops Join BYC
    If you're already a member of our community, click here to login & click here to learn what's new!

getting 8-12 week old pullets--- no idea what im doing

Discussion in 'Raising Baby Chicks' started by mtnchickenmomma, Aug 11, 2013.

  1. mtnchickenmomma

    mtnchickenmomma New Egg

    9
    0
    7
    Aug 11, 2013
    i am getting 2 barred rock pullets, 2 silver laced wyandottes and 2 silver laced cochins.

    we just finished their coop today and are very excited to get our pullets. although, im starting to think i dont know what ive gotten my family into.

    please excuse the million questions:

    any recommendations on food?

    can they be in their coop full-time? i do live in the mtns, temps around 80 during the day and 55 at night.

    do i need a lamp for them outside? keep indoors? and where do i keep such big pullets indoors with 2 young kids already?

    training?

    treats?

    predators? should i only let them out to free-roam when i am there to watch for predators?

    and any other helpful advice for a first time "chicken mom"
     
  2. sumi

    sumi Égalité Staff Member

    35,972
    7,424
    646
    Jun 28, 2011
    Rep of Ireland
    [​IMG]

    When are you getting your chickens and are they ranging in age from 8-12 weeks old? Let's see, questions...

    I'm not 100% sure about their age here, so I would say flock raiser or grower feed for these guys. When they are close to laying age (over 16 weeks at least) you can start thinking about giving them layer feed, though I personally prefer feeding grower until I see the first egg and then switch, or start offering oystershell on the side for extra calcium until I run out grower. Feed brands I cannot help you with, sorry! Wrong country. But pop in at the Feeding & Watering Your Flock section for feed discussions and recommendations.

    Preferably they should spent some outside time as well, unless the weather is really awful (heavy snow/rain/wind) and you have a spacious coop for them.

    At the age of 8 weeks and older they do not need additional heating (heat lamp) any more. They will be fine outside, in a run or free ranging, as long as they have a coop they can return to at night and take shelter in during the day when the weather turns foul.

    I'm not sure what you mean with training?

    Treats ideas here: https://www.backyardchickens.com/t/21530/feedback-on-learning-center-treats-chart

    Predators, always a concern for chicken owners! I don't know where you live, so I can't tell you exactly what to prepare and look out for etc, but here are some articles on the most common predators and pests that chicken owners have to deal with:

    https://www.backyardchickens.com/a/chicken-predators-pests-how-to-protect-treat-your-flock

    I also highly recommend browsing through our Learning Center and have a look here for some more frequently asked questions and links to discussions (chicken questions, post #2):

    https://www.backyardchickens.com/t/204/backyardchickens-forum-faq#post_1198

    Enjoy the forum and your chickens!
     
  3. RonC

    RonC Chillin' With My Peeps

    1,511
    120
    186
    Feb 28, 2012
    D/FW
    Again Welcome. Sumi gave some excellent advice.Any major brand (Purina,Dumor) chick starter,grower or flockraiser will work till they start laying, not that some of the lesser names are not as good. I find they waste less feeding pellets over the crumbles at that age. Other than predators,food and water they take pretty good care of themselves.
     
  4. Bullitt

    Bullitt Chillin' With My Peeps

    2,234
    109
    201
    Jan 16, 2012
    Texas
    How large is your coop? Do you have a run connected to the coop? If so, how large is the run?

    It might be wise to only allow the chicken to freerange when you are around to watch the chickens. If you are in the mountains, there will be many predators that can easily kill large chickens that can barely fly. If you just plan to have chickens for eggs, I would suggest getting some Brown Leghorn hens. These hens can fly up into the trees to avoid predators, and will provide more eggs than just about any breed, other than some of the other Leghorns, such as the White Leghorn.

    You can feed the pullets regular chicken feed at that age. You might want to feed them laying feed starting at about 5 months to help them produce more eggs.
     
    Last edited: Aug 12, 2013
  5. Lisa202

    Lisa202 Chillin' With My Peeps

    719
    7
    133
    Aug 20, 2010
    Long Island NY
  6. The Chickeneer

    The Chickeneer ~A Morning's Crow~

     
    Last edited: Aug 12, 2013
  7. ChirpyChicks1

    ChirpyChicks1 Chillin' With My Peeps

    1,712
    83
    158
    Jul 22, 2013
    You've been given great advice above so I'll just say Good Luck!!!
     

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by