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Great, red mites!

Discussion in 'Predators and Pests' started by csaylorchickens, Dec 31, 2015.

  1. chickengeorgeto

    chickengeorgeto Overrun With Chickens

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    Red Mites live in the roosting polls, in the cracks, and in the joints of your coop, then come out in huge numbers after dark to feed on your chickens. Treating the chicken or its plumage to control* Red Mites is a futile operation. Like the Terminator "They'll be back." You will achieve almost total control* however if you mix Diesel oil or used motor oil with Permethrin and use a paint brush to dab this mixture onto the roost polls, paint the wood parts, and fill up the cracks or cracks in the wood, you will not only kill the Red Mites that you currently have but you will prevent new Red Mites from recolonizing your coop. The choice is yours.

    * In agriculture there are two ways to deal with pest.
    Control means that you try to kill all the pests, managing pests means that you employ some alternative strategy like crop rotation to keep the numbers of pest down to some arbitrary level that doesn't represent a serious monetary lost.

    Chickens have an oil gland at the root of their tail and they use the oil produced therein to dress and waterproof their feathers while grooming themselves. You can watch a chicken apply oil to its plumage by sticking its head into the base of its tail feathers then using its beak to spread the oil along its feathers. It looks somewhat like the bird is nibbling its plumage. This also is how a chicken interlocks its feathers to the adjoining feathers which not only provides a weather proof covering but help it fly to roost and hopefully fly out of danger.

    Shampooing a chicken removes this oil and leaves the chicken open all kinds of skin problems.
    Again, the choice is yours.
     
  2. csaylorchickens

    csaylorchickens Chillin' With My Peeps

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    What about using wood sealant and the permethrin powder mixed together?
     
  3. csaylorchickens

    csaylorchickens Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Ok I'm going out to see the coop now to see how bad it is. It might be just a brown mite I only saw them on her feathers shafts by her vent area, tiny little guys. Fingers crossed it's not horrible. I'll wait till Tuesday when I have the permitherin powder. I'll spray down the whole coop air it out all day and wipe some sort of mixture on the whole coop as well as add it to their dust bath. Maybe instead of soap I can just dunk them.in warm water and loosen the mites that I can there aren't very many
     
  4. csaylorchickens

    csaylorchickens Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Well not one bug seen but it has only been dark for 30 min I'll recheck in an hour or two. Maybe I got lucky and she just has a few brown mites of some kind and it will be easy to treat I'll still wash everything downo with water and put powder down as prevention
     
  5. oldhenlikesdogs

    oldhenlikesdogs Runs With Chickens Premium Member

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    Mite can build up a bit in winter, I find they are in the nestboxes mostly, clean out old bedding and dust a few areas.
     
  6. JanetMarie

    JanetMarie Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Neem seed oil works better than anything I have ever used. Can be used directly on the bird, and on the roosts. I used to use permethrin, and it worked for about a year, then the mites became immune to it.
     
  7. csaylorchickens

    csaylorchickens Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Yea from what I read mites are more active in the spring and summer during the warmer weather
     
  8. csaylorchickens

    csaylorchickens Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Thank u! Is it thick oil and how often do you apply it?
     
  9. JanetMarie

    JanetMarie Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Right now I only have to use it on one rooster who the mites target. I put directly on him where the mites are. I re-treat him when I see a few mites on him again, which is about 3-4 weeks later. The oil is thick and strong, so it doesn't take much. I have only been using it for a few months, and just put it on the roosts once, which was 2 months ago, so I probably should apply some again.

    You might be able to find it in the organic section of a garden center, or a nutritional products store. There's a thread about it called Neem oil for mites.
     
  10. oldhenlikesdogs

    oldhenlikesdogs Runs With Chickens Premium Member

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    The ability to properly dust bath in winter because of frozen ground can allow mites to get out of control.
     

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