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Guinea Triumph!

Discussion in 'Guinea Fowl' started by damselfish, Jun 22, 2011.

  1. damselfish

    damselfish Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Mar 8, 2008
    Southwest Missouri
    I almost hate to post this because whenever I post about how awesome our guineas are, they think up something devilish to do.

    OK, so our current mama guinea is awesome anyway.

    Smart enough to nest and hatch 21 babies in the coop, and keep them in the first day, luxuriously laying in the sun right next to the open door, but not letting a single one get out.

    Smart enough to stay still while we used a tractor to drop a huge cage over the top of her the first few nights after hatch (days 2-4 since the babies were too small to get back in the coop once she had taken them out).

    Smart enough to let us help her herd the chicks (edited: oops, I mean keets!) in for the last few nights (days 5-7) after we made the ramp a little easier.

    And now, drum roll, smart enough, on day 8, to have them all in the coop and ready for bed by 7:45 when I went out last night to see if it was time to start herding them. She gave me that look, like "What are you doing here? I have SO got this covered!"

    She just rocks. The whole flock rocks...they serve as nannies, they catch bugs for the babies, they take them to the barn when it rains. They are so darned good.

    I just had to tell someone besides DH how great they are.

    And now, of course, they will do something terrible to tease me: go walkabout to the local creek, perhaps. [​IMG] I think they read this forum.

    Oh, and the disclaimer: This has been a long road and we are not necessarily recommending that you let your guineas hatch and raise their babies. I've heard all the horror stories of bad-mammaing and of course we are still accepting a significant predator risk. But if you have an older, street-smart, reasonable sized flock who are all used to a routine and trust you, it can work. They will do their very best for the babies but you have to be there to kind of take up the slack as needed (such as dropping a giant cage on them and then sleeping with the window open to run out with the gun as necessary, and it was necessary, LOL!). Our previous mama-raised batch was small, only 4, but they got 3 of them to adulthood with similar help.
     
    Last edited: Jun 22, 2011
  2. taprock

    taprock Chillin' With My Peeps

    She sound great! I only hope my slightly scatterbrained bunch do so well in the future.
     
  3. terrilhb

    terrilhb Chillin' With My Peeps

    Dec 11, 2010
    Georgia
    What a great mommy she is. [​IMG] I just hatched my 1st 17 ever. They are 7 weeks old now. They are so cute. I swear they get cuter by the day. Congratulations on her and the rest of the flock.
     
  4. damselfish

    damselfish Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Mar 8, 2008
    Southwest Missouri
    Thanks both of you! We are very fond of our guineas, as I know you can tell. I learned so much on here to help us take care of ours. I hope you both have wonderful luck with yours. Patience, routine and a stout safe coop for night has gotten us a long way this last three years.
     
  5. racuda

    racuda Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Oct 1, 2008
    North Carolina
    It sounds like you are lucky. [​IMG]

    The one and only time I let mine hatch some, she got off the nest after only 5 or 6 keets hatched, leaving a nest full of eggs. Then I found one keet dead every day until they were all gone. [​IMG]
     
  6. robin416

    robin416 Chillin' With My Peeps

    Feb 6, 2007
    Folks, its not that Guinea hens are good or bad mothers. Its instinct. Their parenting instincts formed from their natural environment that was hot and dry. Here our mornings are cool and for the most part damp. In the wilds it is imperative that keets be up and on the move to prevent predation. The hens did not have to hunker over keets during the day to warm them back up.

    I bet anyone in the dry SW that allowed Guinea hens to raise their keets they would be far more successful than those of us in the climate any where else in the states.
     
  7. chi-chick

    chi-chick Out Of The Brooder

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    Mar 24, 2011
    [​IMG] Way to go !!

    Charlene
     

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