have a new addition and not sure what to do

Discussion in 'Raising Baby Chicks' started by jlsmithii, Mar 17, 2011.

  1. jlsmithii

    jlsmithii New Egg

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    Mar 7, 2011
    so today i was in the feed store and picked up a charity case...

    they had a buff orpington that had been partially denuded by its peers and needed a good home - lucky me (the bird was FREE, how could i say no)

    so i have this chicken now and she is isolated from the rest of the flock of 9 in the brooder box
    she has a quarter size area of bare skin (no blood) just cephalad to her tail
    the plan is to keep her isolated and but antibiotic ointment on it.
    my questions are:
    1) should i do anything else?
    2) how long should i keep her in isolation?
    3) will introducing her to the flock at a later date be a problem? i've read that this breed is rather docile and potentially fare poorly in mixed flocks (which i have) and i am concerned about this.

    thanks for any input
     
    Last edited: Mar 17, 2011
  2. jlsmithii

    jlsmithii New Egg

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    Mar 7, 2011
    addendum:
    did have a prior problem with an overly aggressive rhode island red which has since sorted itself out but i am also concerned that a premature introduction of this new bird may retrigger this problem.
     
  3. gryeyes

    gryeyes Covered in Pet Hair & Feathers

    It would be an easier task if there were TWO to integrate into the flock, later.

    What I do is put newcomers, once they're old enough, out into a "grow-out" coop INSIDE the main run area. A doghouse or small coop type building will do, with chicken wire held up by garden stakes around it, inside the main coop. They get their own waterer and feeder, and for two weeks, nobody can actually get to them, but everybody can see, smell, and hear each other through the chicken wire. There might be some pecking or chest bumping activity through the temporary fence, but nobody can hurt anybody else.

    In two weeks, take down the temporary fence; just pull up the stakes and let them mingle. Keep the separate waterer and feeder there.

    They won't be Stranger Chickens, but "oh, it's just you! - don't forget we get treats before YOU!" type activity. Some chasing, some squawking, maybe even some pecking and a few feathers flying, but nothing major.

    Good luck!

    Edited to add: I have a Buff Orpington in my very mixed flock, and she is one of my senior hens. She's not bullied AT ALL. She was high in seniority even before she went broody and hatched my first GrandChick. She was a fierce mom to her surrogate daughter! (The egg she hatched wasn't one of hers...)
     
    Last edited: Mar 18, 2011
  4. jlsmithii

    jlsmithii New Egg

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    Mar 7, 2011
    thanks for the advice.

    i have her in the same brooder box right now as the others - just walled off with cardboard but there are windows so she sees the others. hopefully this will make it easier.

    i was also toying with the idea of adding a more docile hen with her to aid the transition. any thoughts on that?
     
    Last edited: Mar 18, 2011

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