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Help! Buff Orp started to limp after free range today

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by LisaChick1, Oct 14, 2014.

  1. LisaChick1

    LisaChick1 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jul 10, 2014
    Carmel Valley
    My 20 week old Buff Orpington was free ranging today running around happy and healthy. I put them back in their run, went inside to grab some strawberries and she had a very serious limp. I took her in and felt her feet and on the back of her left ankle area there seemed to be a very tiny sharp like sticker sticking out which I grabbed.... It also looks like she has a tiny red cut that is scanned over and not anything very alarming at all but right in the same area.... But I don't know if the sharp piece actually penetrated her skin and really was the culprit or if it was just something hard stuck to her leg.... I put neosporne on her and held her for a half an hour while she was extremely docile, she was breathing hard and seemed stressed. She is now limping with her tail pointed down and even seems to have her wings not as close up to her body... and keeps closing her eyes and laying down.... I'm so worried.... Could all of this behavior really just be from this one little place that I think? It seemed so minor but she is so stressed. :(((
    Not sure what to do for the poor girl?
     
  2. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive Chicken Obsessed Premium Member

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    Apr 3, 2011
    southern Ohio
    I would check on her in the morning, and look at her affected foot for any dark spot on the foot pad that might be bumblefoot, or any swelling of the foot, leg or the leg joints. Resting her leg in a cage with food and water within sight of the others for 1-2 weeks may help her if it is an injury such as a sprain.
     
  3. LisaChick1

    LisaChick1 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jul 10, 2014
    Carmel Valley
    Thank you for responding! I don't see anything on the pad of either foot but will continue to keep a close watch. I kept her inside since yesterday in a large open top box with food and water because I didn't have a proper way to separate her while still keeping her protected and warm from the rain.... : / any suggestions? Thank you again!!!
     
    Last edited: Oct 15, 2014
  4. Sarevan

    Sarevan Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Sep 30, 2013
    White Swan, WA
    To seperate my chickens that need observation, recovery time I use a large dog crate in the coop so they can see the others. I have chicken wire that isn't good for fencing as a dog can chew through it, I make a small enclosure in the run or coop held up by small posts to make a temporary sectioned off area. I'm going to use that wire in the coop to make an area for my broody when/if chicks hatch.


    Other ideas for seperating birds.

    Cardboard boxes and screen material over top, cat/dog carriers are good for very short term seperation, plastic 2x3 foot containers with an oven rack for a top (used for an emergency egg bound hen. Strawbales made in a square or rectangle wire or screen over top to keep them inside. They will scratch &peck at the bales looking for bugs or grain. Chicken wire is flexible can be made into a dome edges held together with wire or a strong twine ( make sure they can't unravel it and swallow twine). Attach the dome to something sturdy so it stays in place in coop and they can't get out.

    2x2 boards cut to whatever length you want, screen or chicken wire for sides, staples or fencing nails to hold wire in place can be made as a hospital area that is protected in run or coop. Or use more sturdy wire make it bigger, door access from top to get them out. You then have a covered area to set in field or yard for them to scratch around. I leave the bottom free from wire so it is not safe to leave them in it unattended if you have dogs or predators in area, they can dig under it or even flip it over depending on weight.

    Small tarps, garbage bags, or plastc sheeting can be used to keep things covered from rain & snow.
    Good luck!
     

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