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help design my coop

Discussion in 'Coop & Run - Design, Construction, & Maintenance' started by polychickens, May 27, 2007.

  1. polychickens

    polychickens Out Of The Brooder

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    Apr 23, 2007
    I have partitioned an existing shed into what will be a hen house when my chickens are adults. It will house 36 hens. I need ideas for roosts and droppings pit(s). Links to pictures/examples would be fine or just a description will work.

    The area is 8x18 plus a short 3x5 'hall' entryway. I think I would prefer a couple of longer roosts instead of the stair approach so as to maximize floor space.

    I am thinking of placing the roosts up high as my chickens seem to jockey for the higher spots now. Maybe a high roost with a droppings 'trough' just under it and chicken wire in between. This would leave the floor cleaner and open.

    The floor is concrete and I am unsure of what to cover it with. Also, would I need a 'ladder' to the roosts, or maybe several shelves or nooks for them to jump up. The height would only be 6 feet of so.

    Thanks for the help!

    Polychickens
     
  2. DementedHam

    DementedHam Chillin' With My Peeps

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    May 23, 2007
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    I'm not sure what type of chickens you have but mine can 'fly' up to a roost of five feet with a little bit of difficulty but not much. Maybe one at four feet and others at six so that they can reach the first one and move up from there.
     
  3. allen wranch

    allen wranch Overrun With Chickens Premium Member

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    Jan 11, 2007
    San Marcos, TX
    Cover the concrete in deep sand or pine shavings. The chickens need a cushion when then come down off the roosts to prevent leg and foot injuries.

    Birds may use a ladder to reach a roost, but they usually fly down to get off. So the higher the roost, the more potential for leg and foot problems, especially for the heavier breeds.

    Birds usually seek the highest roost, so if you need several, there is less jockying for positions if the roosts are the same height. I personally wouldn't make them any higher than about 4', less if you have heavier breeds.
     

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