Help on aggressive rooster.

Discussion in 'Chicken Behaviors and Egglaying' started by Eps32, Feb 7, 2016.

  1. Eps32

    Eps32 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Now any rooster that's ever showed aggression i have put down and ate. My mom picked out her own chicken who turned out to be a rooster. He's 7 months old now and if you turn your back on him he attacks. I have to carry a stick around to keep him at bay. I would have put him in the crock pot a month ago when he had is first show of aggression. But my mom has begged me to let him live she named him and throws him treats over are fence in the backyard. Witch is fine cause he can't get to her. She really never walks to the coops witch are on the other side of are 8 acre land in a two acre cleared area. The chickens all free range. And I tend to them all so I'm the one being mostly attacked. He also attacked my cousin today. So I brought up putting him down and she started crying. So is there anything I can do to work the aggression out of him? I'm willing to work with him and try to save him for my mom. So any suggestions would be great. Oh and he's a beautiful black Minorca. If the breed matters just thought I'd mention it. Thanks
     
  2. Jesusfreak101

    Jesusfreak101 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    You can try to make him respect you(ego fear you) by chasing him, holding him upside down ect. But he never going to be safe for kids or anyone to be around he veiws you not as the dominate rooster and will attack or he see you as a threat either way she has to understand that he can do alot of damage to a child so if there are kids around he should be culled.
     
  3. oldhenlikesdogs

    oldhenlikesdogs Lots of Chickens Premium Member

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    My best tool is my chicken catching net, it's a fishing net I use to catch chickens, the chickens scatter when they see it. I would use it to block, catch and pin the rooster down, then release him, eventually he should leave you alone and run, never turn your back to him, he's probably a bit hormonal and has decided you look easy. No need to be cruel or get into a fight with him, just use the net as an extension of yourself. If a net isn't handy that a plastic rake or a broom can work. Most roosters will grow out of the extreme protective reaction if given time and worked with properly.
     
  4. pfields

    pfields Chillin' With My Peeps

    I tried the chasing and it didn't work at all, it just made him meaner. He finally got me one morning on both legs. We knew his spurs were covered with bacteria so my husband took me to the ER (Sat. morning). The PA gave me a shot for the pain and a shot and prescription for antibiotics. By that evening my left ankle was so swollen I couldn't put any weigh on it at all. I have scars on my legs from that attack.
     
  5. waddles99

    waddles99 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I know it sounds mean, but a good kick is all it took for me. Aggressive roosters can be dangerous and just a pain when trying to do chores.
     
  6. pfields

    pfields Chillin' With My Peeps

    I hit mine so hard one day that I thought I had killed him after he came after my husband who didn't have anything in his hands to protect himself. We were working on the coop and the only thing I could grab was the large level we were using.

    My mistake was turning my back on him even when he was a good distance away for me. I thought he was not paying any attention to me because he was surrounded by all the hens by the fence.

    The odd thing is I had two roosters. The black one was the mean one and the white wasn't. After I sold the black one, the white one turned mean overnight.
     
  7. pfields

    pfields Chillin' With My Peeps

    The first time he got me that morning was from the back on my right leg, and when he came after me again, I tried to kick him with my left leg and he came down on that leg with both spurs.
     
  8. waddles99

    waddles99 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Wow. That sounds like a particularly aggressive rooster. I know most roosters are aggressive but not like that. I wouldn't keep him around much longer if i were you. He sounds like trouble.
     
  9. pfields

    pfields Chillin' With My Peeps

    I would have killed him myself but was on crutches for two days so my husband took care of him. All that's left of him are his two spurs which I saved. I gave him too many chances and paid for it.

    I have a BO rooster now that so far is really nice. This time, and it may be his breed, but this time I'm not chasing him, speaking rough to him or trying to be the alpha, I just ignore him but keep an eye on him. He was a year old in January.
     
  10. lazy gardener

    lazy gardener True BYC Addict

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    Let me get this straight. You do all of the chicken chores. Your mother does not go near "her" rooster. She enjoys looking at him, and tossing treats over the fence. She is never in close proximity to him where she could get injured. This bird has attacked you more than once. He has attacked your cousin. Tell your mother to pull up her big girl panties and get a grip. No rooster is more important than her daughter. Or for that matter, any other innocent person who gets within spur range. It could be a non family member. Law suits are expensive. If she wants to have "her chicken", let her pick out a couple of sex link pullets after you put this bad boy to rest. The last thing you want to do is let him play in the gene pool. Aggressive roos tend to produce aggressive offspring.
     
    Last edited: Feb 7, 2016

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