hen has a hole in her side!

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by Little Barnyard, Mar 19, 2009.

  1. Little Barnyard

    Little Barnyard Out Of The Brooder

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    Mar 1, 2009
    HELP!!!!
    our hen has a HUGE hole in her side! we are pretty sure it was by a roo's spur, however like i said it is HUGE!!!!
    about five inches long...you can see her inside and when she moves you can see her insides move [​IMG]
    there is not much to sow together...
    please post any ideas as to what to put on it, how to badage it, etc...
    PLEASE HELP A.S.A.P.!!!

    [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Mar 19, 2009
  2. farmer macdonald123

    farmer macdonald123 Out Of The Brooder

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    Mar 17, 2009
    north carolina
    i would get the roosters spurs removed neosporin and call a vet puncture wounds
    are dangerous
     
  3. CTChickenMom

    CTChickenMom Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jan 5, 2009
    SE Connecticut
    I don't have experience here but definitely keep her in a warm, dry, small space to keep her from moving about. If she isn't bleeding much, the spur likely missed her internal organs. Neosporin with out the pain killer isn't good for deep wounds. Puncture wounds need to be left open to drain and heal properly (other animal experience). Flush it well with diluted betadine or peroxide and get her some broad spectrum antibiotics soon.

    Trim her feathers around the hole and use one SteriStrip to hold the widest part of the hole closed (but don't close completely). She will need those antibiotics as the roos spurs are very dirty. Keep her quiet and calm, try to give some electrolytes and some B12 to help boost her system and fuel healing.

    Keep us posted.
     
  4. Pumpkinpup

    Pumpkinpup Poultry Princess

    Jul 16, 2008
    North-West Georgia
    I had a hen that this happened to. She is doing fantastic now and laying eggs again even.
    Elaine was ripped open by my huge orp roo, Elvis! I just sprayed the wound good with blue kote, gave her injectable procaine G and put her in cage by herself for several weeks. She is back running with the other girls now and other than the purple stins on her feathers, you would never know it even happened. [​IMG]
     
  5. hobbychick

    hobbychick Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Illinois
    You could try cleaning it up with some antibacterial soap, and a small amount of peroxide. You do not want to use alot of peroxide just enough to clean it up. Then hold the pieces together and superglue them closed. The superglue you buy at the store is pretty much the same stuff as tissue adhesive they use in a vets office. I have worked in a vet clinic for 8 years and it should work. I would also follow up with penicillin. Good luck and let us know how it turns out!!![​IMG]
     
  6. thebritt

    thebritt Chillin' With My Peeps

    Mar 5, 2009
    Humboldt County
    Quote:I totally agree with Chickenmom. Flushing is easily done with a 12cc - 20cc srynge (NO needle). Keep a sharp eye and nose out for infection.
    Keeping deep puncture wounds open is very important as they need to heal from the inside out. Covering risks sealing the infection in and allowing it to spread to deeper tissues, organs, even bone.
    A heating pad on low under 1/2 her space would be good - would help her conserve her energy and speeds healing. Good luck.
     
  7. BarkerChickens

    BarkerChickens Microbrewing Chickenologist

    Nov 25, 2007
    High Desert, CA
    Quote:I totally agree with Chickenmom. Flushing is easily done with a 12cc - 20cc srynge (NO needle). Keep a sharp eye and nose out for infection.
    Keeping deep puncture wounds open is very important as they need to heal from the inside out. Covering risks sealing the infection in and allowing it to spread to deeper tissues, organs, even bone.
    A heating pad on low under 1/2 her space would be good - would help her conserve her energy and speeds healing. Good luck.

    I agree with Chickenmom and thebritt. I have done similar with chicken puncture wounds. The irrigation syringe is awesome! Additionally, I recommend an antibiotic, either injectable or water soluble. I personally use Auremycin, but any any chicken approved, broad spectrum antibiotic should do. Puncture wounds can get infected easy and the anitibiotics are cheap at feed stores and vet supplies, so it is a great prevention without breaking the bank. Good luck!
     
  8. Sunny Side Up

    Sunny Side Up Count your many blessings...

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    Loxahatchee, Florida
    I have a little pullet with a similar injury. It's deep but not all the way through. She was in a pen with a few other pullets & some cockerels on their way to being dinner. They don't even have spurs yet, but they sure did some damage to her sides, poor dear. When I saw her this morning she was sitting quietly on top of the nest box, her comb/wattle color is good & her eyes are bright, but she felt cold to the touch. Then I saw how bad her injuries were and I went cold...

    I washed her well with warm soapy water & have her on shredded newspapers in a plastic bin. She's in a darkened bathroom with a desk lamp over the bin for warmth. I'm adding antibiotic powder & electrolyte powder to her water & also using that water to wet her feed. I haven't bandaged her side, going to let Ma Nature care for that. She's eating & looking content, but setting quietly in the bin, not trying to get out.

    God bless & heal our dear injured birds!
     
  9. Little Barnyard

    Little Barnyard Out Of The Brooder

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    Mar 1, 2009
    Thanks everybody. I have Amber in quartine and she is doing awesome. I coated the cut with neo and started her on antibotics in her water.
     
  10. SundownWaterfowl

    SundownWaterfowl Overrun With Chickens

    I had that happen to a hen. She had a 2 holes where the skin was ripped right down to the meat. I just seperated her and within 2 weeks the holes had skin back over, and new feathers were starting to come in.
     

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