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Hen Saddle question

Discussion in 'Chicken Behaviors and Egglaying' started by LMVB, Feb 1, 2017.

  1. LMVB

    LMVB Out Of The Brooder

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    I have a rooster that is overly amorous with a couple of the hens. This rooster and I do not get along--he's come at me numerous times and now I'm spooked. My neighbor came over one night this past weekend and helped me grab the 2 hens he's be riding too much, and she put the hen saddles on. Things are going well, but my question is: how long do I leave the saddles on? Do I need to do another night raid to look under there and see how they are healing, if they are getting their feathers back in?? I don't want to leave them on too long. We want some chicks in the spring, which isn't too far off here. Thanks for the input!
     
  2. Pork Pie Ken

    Pork Pie Ken Monkey Business Premium Member

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    If its not just feather loss, then i would suggest treating the wounds and letting them heal before putting the saddles on. Wounds will heal much faster without the saddles. Keep them separate from the flock until they are fully healed.
     
  3. LMVB

    LMVB Out Of The Brooder

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    It's just feather loss,no open wounds or anything like that. Should I take the saddles off? I noticed his talon marks on the back of the saddles today, so they are keeping him from doing more damage. But I worry about leaving them on too long without looking at what's going on under. At the same time, I HATE sneaking in at night for a chicken caper--he gets so ornery. Anyway, they ARE working but I wish he'd just go away so we could have some peace [​IMG]!
     
  4. oldhenlikesdogs

    oldhenlikesdogs Sits With Chickens Premium Member

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    Many times the feathers won't grow back until the fall when they go through an adult molt. I personally would be penning the rooster up until I need him so the hens aren't always stressed by him. The saddles are technically suppose to stay on until the breeding season is over which again is in the fall. The saddles can interfere with the birds properly grooming and dust bathing so watch for external parasites, and in summer for them overheating. I find it easier to pen the rooster.
     
    1 person likes this.
  5. LMVB

    LMVB Out Of The Brooder

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    Oops! Think I put my reply in the wrong place! I'd love to keep that roo penned more, but 1) it makes him more aggressive towards me, and 2) the hens get all crazy when he's gone. My hope is to let a few eggs hatch this spring, get at least 1 male and "replace" new rooster for this aggressive male. I'm new to raising chickens and took all the wrong advice on dealing with the rooster (tho, I thought I'd done so much research, for weeks!) So, now, I just try to work around him, his behavior issues are partly my fault. I feel bad for him, knowing I've unknowingly created this situation. I don't know, maybe the new male could be even worse! Thanks for all the feed-back and help to all. I think I'll leave the saddles on a few more days, then check what's going on under there next week. I know he's just doing his job, but mainly on 2 hens, not the other 3!
     
  6. oldhenlikesdogs

    oldhenlikesdogs Sits With Chickens Premium Member

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    Almost every rooster will favor certain hens and breed them more, usually they are the more submissive ones in the flock, or those laying more.
     
  7. LMVB

    LMVB Out Of The Brooder

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    That makes sense! Thanks!
     
  8. wamtazlady

    wamtazlady Chillin' With My Peeps

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    My rooster overused one hen and was fine with the other 11. Rooster had to go when he attacked my grandson. She didn't get feathers until he following November.

    I have read that sometimes personality is inherited. So an aggressive rooster is more likely to father an aggressive rooster. I ended up getting a Salmon Faverolles rooster. He was wonderful. Took wonderful care of the hens. Never attacked anyone. I've got another ordered for the spring.
     
  9. LMVB

    LMVB Out Of The Brooder

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    Hmmm....didn't know about the possibility of inherited traits. Need to rethink. He often makes a feint towards me, but I just shoo him away with whatever I have in my hands. Sometimes he rushes back at me, but usually he just eyes me and eventually moves on. I've tried to give him space, and not focus on him and that seems to work, most of the time. I'm not familiar with the breed you mentioned. I'll look it up, but right now, I'm at a loss as to what to do with the existing rooster! He's about 1-1/2 years old--too old and tough to eat, and no body will take him in. [​IMG]. If you got another rooster, how old was it, and how did the hens react, what were the general dynamics between the hens and a new, presumably younger, rooster? These hens and the rooster were all raised together from day 2. Thanks for your thoughts!
     
  10. LMVB

    LMVB Out Of The Brooder

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    I should have added that the existing rooster, the one that is aggressive towards me and over-using a couple of the hens, is an Astrolorpe. Just an FYI, I have 2 Astrolorpes (1 female and 1 male), the rest are hens: 2 Plymouth barr rocks and 2 Easter Eggers, a total of 6 chickens. The female Astrolorpe is very friendly to me, which irritates the roo to no end! Anyway, just thought I'd add that to see if that would make any difference in advice. Thanks!
     

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