Hens attacking broody?

Discussion in 'Chicken Behaviors and Egglaying' started by mrsmaonaigh, May 8, 2011.

  1. mrsmaonaigh

    mrsmaonaigh Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Sep 2, 2010
    SE Georgia
    I have a girl who has been broody for a couple of weeks now. When she comes off the nest its crazy out in the yard. Several other hens (some pullets) start attacking her and she fights with them. We're talking spurring and full out fighting. The girls have never had an issue with her before this. Even the rooster seems to not like her any more. He's not attacking her but if she comes around he snips at her. What is going on?
     
  2. Zaxby's2

    Zaxby's2 Chillin' With My Peeps

    Apr 10, 2011
    a place
    Rivalry. I would separate her. Good luck! [​IMG]
     
  3. sourland

    sourland Broody Magician Premium Member

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    May 3, 2009
    New Jersey
    It's the pecking order. Due to her change in behavior, she is now regarded as a stranger.
     
  4. mrsmaonaigh

    mrsmaonaigh Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Sep 2, 2010
    SE Georgia
    Will I be able to put her back with the flock once she hatches her chicks?
     
  5. Barrdwing

    Barrdwing Chillin' With My Peeps

    Yes, eventually. Our broody hens are very protective of their chicks for the first month or so, and often it's easier to just fence off a corner of the coop for the hen to nest and raise her chicks. Once the chicks are about a month old, their mother starts getting less protective. Also, because the other hens have been able to see the chicks all along, they have gotten used to them and are less likely to go after them.

    When re-integrating the mother and her chicks, I tend to stand around and keep an eye on things the first day I let them out. (So does the rooster.) When the hens fight, either I step in or he does. Eventually the hens work out the pecking order and settle down. With the chicks, I make sure to leave them a place to hide--usually their original corner--where the adult hens can't come in after them. I leave food and water in there for them so that they don't have to compete with the bigger birds. Another way to protect the chicks' food and water is to build a creep feeder.
     
    Last edited: May 8, 2011

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