High humidity ruining the Hova Bator 1588?!

kuchchicks

Songster
Apr 8, 2015
1,027
145
171
I had a very successful hatch the first time I used this new bator. I just finished the hatch on Sunday. Then I unplugged it, cleaned it out, let it dry, and then plugged it back in on Tuesday to do a new batch. But when I did the temp was reading 100.0 but was only actually 98.0. I was able to get it re-set (temporarily) after talking to the company. (It is not holding the temp though so they are sending me a new thermostat tomorrow).

So upon talking with the tech at the company it turns out that the problem MAY have been caused by my humidity at lock down. I ran dry (30%) during the first 17 days and then went up to 75% at lock down. I did not realize that it is not recommended to run the bator above 65% - and no it is not in the directions... I read them before I started for the first time and then re-read them again after I got this info and IT IS NOT IN THERE. It is written (on my bator anyway) in very fine print on the control center.

Anyway, I wanted to take a poll... of those of you out there with a digital Hova Bator 1588, how many of you ever run your humidity above 65%? If you do run it above 65% did you have problems with the bator AFTER running it at 65%? And for those of you who DO NOT run your bator above 65% (keep it at 65% or less) have you had any problems with this bator?

I have a new batch in right now and am trying to figure out what I am going to do at lock down. I had great results last time and hate to mess with what works. But at the same time I don't want to ruin my bator.
 

AmyLynn2374

Humidity Queen
5 Years
Oct 11, 2014
15,028
2,680
456
Gouverneur, NY
thumbsup.gif
 

Cold Canadian

Crowing
10 Years
Jun 19, 2010
1,219
745
346
Manitoba Canada
Just my two cents worth .........but why hike the humidity at the end ? once they start hatching it will spike as the added humidity coming from the newly hatched chicks does that ? I used to do what you're doing but stopped when I realized that it wasn't necessary..........I had the fan going , vents open and it was way to high ? ......my two cents worth
 

kuchchicks

Songster
Apr 8, 2015
1,027
145
171
Just my two cents worth .........but why hike the humidity at the end ? once they start hatching it will spike as the added humidity coming from the newly hatched chicks does that ? I used to do what you're doing but stopped when I realized that it wasn't necessary..........I had the fan going , vents open and it was way to high ? ......my two cents worth
So what do you keep your humidity at during the first 17 days and then at lock down?

I run about 30% during the first 17 days... my air cells seemed to be great with that. Then raised it to 75% because in the past when I did not raise my humidity I found that I lost a good number of my chicks during the hatch. The membrane really dried out and even though they would pip, and start to zip, a lot of them if they took any length of time, ended up not making it.

Now with this last hatch that I used the higher humidity at lock down, I only had 1 chick pip but not hatch. When I opened the egg at the end the chick look like it turned and got stuck/head was twisted weird. Of the others that made it to lock down but did not hatch 1 pipped internally but never made it any further, and the rest died somewhere around day 17/18. So in my own personal experience, and what seems to have worked best for me, was running "dry" and then raising it at lock down.
 

AmyLynn2374

Humidity Queen
5 Years
Oct 11, 2014
15,028
2,680
456
Gouverneur, NY
Just my two cents worth .........but why hike the humidity at the end ? once they start hatching it will spike as the added humidity coming from the newly hatched chicks does that ? I used to do what you're doing but stopped when I realized that it wasn't necessary..........I had the fan going , vents open and it was way to high ? ......my two cents worth
You don't see a true hike in the humidity until they actually start hatching and they need the higher humidity during the actual pip so they can make it to the hatch. For those of us that run with a low humidity incubation the first 17 days, 30/40%, the hatching process is only going to give the bare minimum of recommended humidity (if that), which leaves you no room for the occasion that you need to, (or for some of us, our habits is to, ) open the bator. A higher humidity allows not only a better (in my opinion) hatching environment, but also the leeway to open the baator if needs be.
 

Cold Canadian

Crowing
10 Years
Jun 19, 2010
1,219
745
346
Manitoba Canada
You don't see a true hike in the humidity until they actually start hatching and they need the higher humidity during the actual pip so they can make it to the hatch. For those of us that run with a low humidity incubation the first 17 days, 30/40%, the hatching process is only going to give the bare minimum of recommended humidity (if that), which leaves you no room for the occasion that you need to, (or for some of us, our habits is to, ) open the bator. A higher humidity allows not only a better (in my opinion) hatching environment, but also the leeway to open the baator if needs be.

That's it ..........stayed at 30 % to 35 % depending on how full I had the incubator .I have been in discussion groups where others had the same results .Once the hatch started the humidity spiked to a point that the see through windows were fogged ( sometimes have a large portion hatching at the same time )? and I had not added water ? That's why the fan is running ,vents are open , and as they are born I remove them ASAP into a dryer warm brooder box and remove all parts of the shell now , But as was said somewhere , depending on where you are the air humidity can be high , or very dry ......in which case you would most likely add water to maintain the proper humidity . I have never had any issues doing it my way , had huge issues with added water though ? but again to each there own , what ever works best in your situation
So what do you keep your humidity at during the first 17 days and then at lock down?

I run about 30% during the first 17 days... my air cells seemed to be great with that. Then raised it to 75% because in the past when I did not raise my humidity I found that I lost a good number of my chicks during the hatch. The membrane really dried out and even though they would pip, and start to zip, a lot of them if they took any length of time, ended up not making it.

Now with this last hatch that I used the higher humidity at lock down, I only had 1 chick pip but not hatch. When I opened the egg at the end the chick look like it turned and got stuck/head was twisted weird. Of the others that made it to lock down but did not hatch 1 pipped internally but never made it any further, and the rest died somewhere around day 17/18. So in my own personal experience, and what seems to have worked best for me, was running "dry" and then raising it at lock down.

This is from discussions on a different forum where the talk was of the release of humidity from the egg as the chick is growing ? not sure if that is true or not , but after having lost chicks that when I looked at the dead embryo it kinda made sense . My vents are closed and I don't turn on my fan until day 17 , my humidity stays at 30 to 35 percent through these days ........but I have my incubator in a closed room with a constant temp to keep everything atb a even keel .................works for me ?
 
Last edited:

New posts New threads Active threads

Top Bottom