1. If this is your first time on BYC, we suggest you start with one of these three options:
    Raising Chickens Chicken Coops Join BYC
    If you're already a member of our community, click here to login & click here to learn what's new!

How cold is too cold??

Discussion in 'Coop & Run - Design, Construction, & Maintenance' started by hsm5grls, Dec 23, 2007.

  1. hsm5grls

    hsm5grls Chillin' With My Peeps

    781
    1
    153
    Oct 3, 2007
    tucson
    I am thinking I might need a heater in my coop. But I was wondering how cold is to cold for a chicken. It has been about 29 outside and around 35 in the coop at night. My neighbors have no real coop and leave there chickens outside, but is it too cold.
     
  2. Wildsky

    Wildsky Wild Egg!

    11,973
    12
    313
    Oct 13, 2007
    California
    [​IMG] Thats dang near SUMMER! there [​IMG]

    The coldest my coop temp has gone down to is 7.... they're all fine, keep each other cozy!
     
    Last edited: Dec 23, 2007
  3. picklespickles

    picklespickles Chillin' With My Peeps

    Oct 27, 2007
    i think thirty five in the coop is fine.

    it was blizardy here the other night adn only since then have they stayed in teh coop. well, some of them.
     
  4. hsm5grls

    hsm5grls Chillin' With My Peeps

    781
    1
    153
    Oct 3, 2007
    tucson
    Oh good I was worried LOL That is cold to me LOL
     
  5. picklespickles

    picklespickles Chillin' With My Peeps

    Oct 27, 2007
    well, cold to me, too. but i aint got feathers. [​IMG]
     
  6. Galaxie_Man

    Galaxie_Man Chillin' With My Peeps

    I suspended an infrared heat lamp from the ceiling on a timer. The lamp is only plugged in on the 10 degree blustery days, and even then the timer only has it on for a couple of hours in the morning and then again just before sundown. It is just enough to keep the waterer from freezing, and a place for them to come in out of the cold. At night when the coop is closed up, no heat lamp. Even on the coldest nights it's not bad in there, but that's because it is insulated.
     
  7. BeckyLa

    BeckyLa Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jan 11, 2007
    N. Louisiana
    Having grown up in Phoenix, I can't see it ever getting too cold for chickens in Tucson. Unless you have naked necks, now they might have to have scarves. [​IMG]
     
  8. gundog

    gundog New Egg

    6
    0
    7
    Dec 17, 2007
    I dont understand the need for heaters for temps you are talking about. Chickens are farm animals that have been around a lot longer than heaters. They need shelter to keep them out of the weather, some high calorie feed(corn), and a few other birds on the roost so they can share body heat and they should be fine. If you have cold hardy birds I wouldn't even begin to worry until it is below 5 degrees F. I would probably put a red lamp in the coop if it was going to be single digits or lower for an extended time.
     
  9. rooster-red

    rooster-red Here comes the Rooster

    7,008
    18
    261
    Jun 10, 2007
    Douglasville GA
    Humidity also plays a big part in this.

    My FIL had 2 chickens freeze to death inside the coop in 21 degree weather. the more humid the area, the more cold it feels.
     
  10. Charlie Chicken

    Charlie Chicken Chillin' With My Peeps

    108
    0
    119
    Dec 24, 2007
    Phippsburg, ME
    Chicken are built different than humans. We need clothing and supplementary heat to keep warm in the winter but chickens do not. They give off a lot of body heat that gets trapped in their down & feathers. When folks talk about providing their chickens with extra heat I believe they are thinking like a human and because they feel the cold then their chickens must feel it too.

    Sometime when you are out there there shivering in the cold, pick up one of your chickens and tuck your hand under their feathers. You might be amazed at how warm it is in there!

    Where poultry need help (with ventilation and fans) is with too much heat, not cold. That same body heat and insulation works against them when it is hot.
     

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by