How do I know I am about to get eggs

Discussion in 'Chicken Behaviors and Egglaying' started by Welshies, Jun 19, 2017.

  1. Welshies

    Welshies Crowing

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    How can I know when I'll get eggs? I have 4 barnyard mix hens who are fully grown, but don't know their age:confused:
     
  2. KoopOnTruckin

    KoopOnTruckin Songster

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    How long have you had them? You can tell if a hen has laid or is about to lay if you come up on them and they squat like they are accepting a suitor. Also you can check the width of their pelvises to see if an egg could fit in there (a bit more complex, but you get the idea). Do you have any pics of them?
     
  3. Welshies

    Welshies Crowing

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    No, sorry. I don't have a phone right now so I am reduced to the school chromebook. I assume they are very close to laying if they haven't yet, as they were probably between 6 and 8 weeks when my chickens were 4 weeks old (my chickens got eaten, and these hens came from a very sympathetic neighbour.). They were 10 weeks when eaten, they might be between 14 and 20 weeks. They should be laying!!!
    I just got them on Friday though, maybe it will take a few days? Do they need to adjust to the extra light in my coop?
     
  4. KoopOnTruckin

    KoopOnTruckin Songster

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    Well, depending on the breed, they typically start laying around 20-25 weeks or so. May be the stress of being moved, but I would think just give it another month and be a bit more patient.
     
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  5. jolly wattles

    jolly wattles Songster

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    Hens typically start laying 4 to 6 months of age. Although my experience mostly around 6 to 7 months. What are you feeding them? Chick starter, layer feed?? Do you offer oyster shell? If you have them on a layer feed it can slow the maturity process if they aren't laying yet. Supplement with added protein like mealworms or scrambled eggs.
     
  6. Welshies

    Welshies Crowing

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    Layer feed, and free choice grit and oyster shell. They are allowed to free roam when I am around, until my electric fence goes up, and get duck starter and hen scratch once a day (I no longer have ducks and they love the starter, and it hasn't seemed to affect them.) I have only had them since Friday:confused:
     
  7. jolly wattles

    jolly wattles Songster

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    Well in my experience I had 3 hen I got when they were about 3 months. They ate layer feed cause I have older hens and my local feed stores don't carry an all flock feed. Because of this it pushed thier reproduction maturity down the road some and didn't start laying until 7+ months of age. I tried supplementing protein but even still it delayed the arrival of those precious edible eggs.
     
  8. jolly wattles

    jolly wattles Songster

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    At any rate they are still really young if they are only 16 weeks. Have patience. It will happen. You're probably looking more around the 20 to 24 weeks.
     
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  9. aart

    aart Chicken Juggler!

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    Move and change in diet could give them a hiccup.
    I would not expect 14 week olds to lay, typical POL for most breeds is 18-26 weeks.
    Some will start earlier, some will start later.

    Signs of onset of lay---I've found the pelvic points to be the most accurate.
    Squatting:
    If you touch their back they will hunker down on the ground, then shake their tail feathers when they get back up.
    Tho not all birds will do this, especially if there's a cockbird in the flock.
    This shows they are sexually mature and egg laying is close at hand.

    Combs and Wattles:
    Plump, shiny red - usually means laying.
    Shriveled, dryish looking and pale - usually means not laying.
    Tho I have found that the combs and wattles can look full and red one minute then pale back out the next due to exertion or excitement, can drive ya nuts when waiting for a pullet to lay!

    Vent Appearance:
    Dry, tight, and smaller - usually not laying.
    Moist, wide, and larger - usually laying.
    Pelvic Points, feel for the 2 bony points(pelvic bones F-F) on either side of vent:
    Less than 2 fingertip widths apart usually means not laying.
    More than 2 fingertip widths apart usually means laying.
    (Spacing is relative with chickens size and humans finger size.)
    [​IMG]
     
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