How do you stop feather eating/ pecking?

Discussion in 'Chicken Behaviors and Egglaying' started by coopmama, Dec 10, 2015.

  1. Cheetah1

    Cheetah1 Out Of The Brooder

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    That is a sign of cannibulism and we can debeak a chicken. You can shorten their beaks with a file but don't go to far unless you will permanently debeak them. That is not good because that would make it hard to eat. Just go a little into their beak not far though. You can debeak chickens in different ways. Be careful and do research before doing it please. I don't want you hurting a chicken. Thank you. Goodbye :D
     
  2. BBQJOE

    BBQJOE Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Void where prohibited.
    I'm a little late to this party, but....

    I'd also suggest increasing protein, putting wood ash in their dusting place, and keeping them busy buy hanging veggies and stuff from strings.
    Mine were plucking each other like crazy until I did these things.

    ps the ash helps with mites and stuff.
     
    1 person likes this.
  3. 4GingerHens

    4GingerHens Out Of The Brooder

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    Have you ever tried Stockholm Tar? I Swear by the stuff to solve the problem of the feather pecking. It's not expensive you can get it on eBay. I will warn it is messy foul smelling stuff but it not only stops them from pecking at the feathers but also allows the skin to heal. You apply it with a paint small paint brush to the affected areas. It work wonders for my hen who had been badly pecked. And now the one doing the pecking no longer does it. Wear gloves because if you get it on yourself it's hard to wash off.
     
  4. Cheetah1

    Cheetah1 Out Of The Brooder

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    . That is a cool idea. :D
     
  5. enola

    enola Overrun With Chickens

    Cull means to remove a bird from the flock. You can either give the chicken away, or kill it. Cull does not always mean kill.
     
    Last edited: Dec 22, 2015
  6. coopmama

    coopmama Out Of The Brooder

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    First of all, I'd like to thank whoever decided to post this to facebook. It will literally take me days to read through all of the comments, and I am excited to learn from others experiences!

    Second of all, thank you to every one who has taken the time to read this, and especially to those who have commented.

    I would like everyone who reads this to know that I did what I consider to be thorough research on the pinless peepers before I ever ordered them. I searched many sites to see if people thought they were inhimane or not. I then ordered them, and once I received them, I played with them just to make sure that I thought this wouldn't hurt Bertha. When it came time to put them on her, I held her wrapped in a towel, and my husband applied them with his bare hands. She didn't not give any indication whatsoever that this hurt her at all. None. I let her go, and she walked a little crooked (like she was drunk) and flicked at them with her toes, but that was it. I'm sure she's not thrilled to have them on, and it may be slightly uncomfortable, but I feel confident stating that I don't believe they cause her any pain or distress.
    Which leads me to today. It has been four days since she got the peepers on. Percy appears to have some tiny feathers coming in on her butt. No blood. Fingers crossed for hope there. However, I swear Bertha is meaner than ever. She again pinned down one of my BOs when two of them snuck out of the fence when I was cleaning the coop. The peepers have not impaired Bertha's aim at all. She is such a bully! I really don't know what to do with her!
    Bertha & Percy are so attached. If it weren't for that, she would be long gone by now. When I had them separated, they would stand on opposite sides of the fence & stare at each other & chirp back & forth. As soon as I let Percy out, they took off side by side running down through the field to forage together like nothing ever happened. That's the only reason I am trying to fix this. They are generally pretty reliable layers. Also, it gives me some satisfaction to see them becoming more sociable (to people at least).

    Anyway, thanks again to everyone. Keep the ideas & comments coming! I hope somone else gains insight from this post as I have. I can't be the only one to acquire adult chickens with bad habits!

    [​IMG]
    Best picture I could get of Percy's incoming feathers



     
  7. enola

    enola Overrun With Chickens

    As heartless as this may sound...... If you do decide that Bertha has finally become to much trouble for the flock, if you remove her completely by taking her where Percy can't see or hear her, Percy will recover in a couple of days.

    Bullies don't stay in my flock. They cause too much stress for the other flock members.
     
    2 people like this.
  8. coopmama

    coopmama Out Of The Brooder

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    It can also mean "separate":
    [​IMG]

    Sorry for the confusion.
     
  9. coopmama

    coopmama Out Of The Brooder

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    I'm afraid that's the point we are getting to. We are getting a rooster on Sunday morning. I hope he can get her settled down. He's her last hope.
     
  10. briarkpatchfarm

    briarkpatchfarm New Egg

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    I usually nip it in the bud when they are chicks. You make a paste of powdered goldenseal and cayenne pepper and plaster it on the area that is getting pecked. It will give them something to think about and it always worked well.Stopped them cold. The goldenseal tastes like **** but helps heal and cayenne might not feel great on raw flesh but I've don't think I've ever seen a chicken flinch.
     

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