How Fast Does a Barrel Type Plucker Turn?

Discussion in 'Meat Birds ETC' started by Orange Ribbon, Aug 19, 2011.

  1. Orange Ribbon

    Orange Ribbon Chillin' With My Peeps

    580
    2
    121
    Apr 14, 2011
    I used to do taxidermy and I have a tumbler with a 55 gallon barrel on it that I used to put hides in to fluff them up. I was thinking of making it into a chicken plucker, but not sure what the average speed is for it to work right. My tumbler turns pretty slow. I'm guessing maybe 30 to 50 rpm. On the other hand, I wonder if slower isn't better because it won't beat the birds up as bad. Any information you can give me on this would be greatly appreciated. I gave about $500.00 for that piece of equipment, and I sure hate to see it just sitting around if I can use it.
     
  2. ngamtnman

    ngamtnman Out Of The Brooder

    46
    0
    22
    May 18, 2011
    North GA
    The whizbang book I have recomends 150-300 rpm.
     
  3. Mikey D

    Mikey D Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jul 12, 2011
    Apache Junction AZ
    Quote:Good info!
     
  4. Orange Ribbon

    Orange Ribbon Chillin' With My Peeps

    580
    2
    121
    Apr 14, 2011
    Thanks for the info. I guess I'll have to put a bigger motor on it.

    I have another question. On this tumbler the barrel rolls horizontally instead of vertically. Is that an issue?
     
  5. ngamtnman

    ngamtnman Out Of The Brooder

    46
    0
    22
    May 18, 2011
    North GA
    The book recommends a 3/4 hp motor. They usually turn at 1725 rpm , so you have to gear it down. On mine I have a 2.5" pulley on the motor and a 16" pulley on the shaft, so it turns at 260 rpm.

    On the whiz bang the barrel stays stationary with fingers in the sides and then a shaft with a 20" plate with rubber fingers in the bottom that's driven by a electric motor. The barrel is vertical on the whizzbang also. But seems like I saw some horizontal plucker on youtube, so you probably could get it to work.
     
  6. Orange Ribbon

    Orange Ribbon Chillin' With My Peeps

    580
    2
    121
    Apr 14, 2011
    I see! Well, that gives me some more options to consider. Might be able to disconnect the barrel from the motor and hook a cylinder inside to the motor shaft and let it spin. Since it will weigh much less than the barrel it should turn much faster. I'll have to play with it and see what I can come up with. Thanks!
     
  7. ngamtnman

    ngamtnman Out Of The Brooder

    46
    0
    22
    May 18, 2011
    North GA
  8. Orange Ribbon

    Orange Ribbon Chillin' With My Peeps

    580
    2
    121
    Apr 14, 2011
    Quote:Thanks for that link, ngamtnman. Very insightful article.

    I did notice that the inventor of the Whizbang Plucker said if he were building another he would slow it down a little. I am guessing that the speed of the plate ensures the birds get moved around to various positions better to get at all the feathers, and to allow the feathers to fly out the bottom. So I am thinking that my tumbler may work as it is since the birds will be rolled as the barrel turns. Doesn't seem like the speed of the rubber fingers are as much of a need as is the friction or "grab" they have. It may take a little longer in my tumbler for the birds to be plucked clean, but it will be gentler on the meat. I don't need to be in a big rush anyway, just not having to do it by hand is the main thing.

    I'd like to hear what you think about my reasoning here. I might be missing something that is more detrimental than I realize. But I think I will get a bunch of rubber fingers and make about 10 rows the length of the barrel and give it a go. Be interesting to see how it does. If by chance it doesn't work out, I can still turn the frame up on its side and install a plate to turn inside. What do you think? [​IMG]
     
  9. ngamtnman

    ngamtnman Out Of The Brooder

    46
    0
    22
    May 18, 2011
    North GA
    I don't know anything about a taxidermy tumbler but I'm guessing it's similar to a washing machine tub on spin cycle but slower. So, if that's the case then I think it may work but be somewhat slow. I think it would help if there was a stationary object in there for the bird to catch on at times. I think the slower speed would be better, though.
     

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by