How long???

Discussion in 'Managing Your Flock' started by pkrplyraa, Nov 14, 2016.

  1. pkrplyraa

    pkrplyraa New Egg

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    Jun 4, 2014
    I just got a new rooster for my 5 girl flock. Isolated over 30 days. and now I put him in the run in his own special coop inside the run. Hoping the girls would be interested. They have hid in the coop for two days now! I've coaxed them out with snacks but if the rooster fluffs up or crows they just run right back in!
    I plan to put him in with the girls at night when they cant see but want to be sure they are aware on some chicken level that he is part of the coop.
    Advice???
    Thanks
    donna
     
  2. oldhenlikesdogs

    oldhenlikesdogs Sits With Chickens Premium Member

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    Just give them time it can take weeks before they get used to his presence. Take your time and don't push them together. Eventually your girls will get used to him being around, than you can start letting them mingle.

    The rooster should slowly try enticing the hens through the fence and they should become interested. Try giving the rooster something good and see if he tries calling the girls over. A good rooster should make tidbitting calls when treats are given.
     
  3. Mrs. K

    Mrs. K Overrun With Chickens

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    How old is everybody?
     
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  4. Ridgerunner

    Ridgerunner Chicken Obsessed

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    Excellent question.
     
  5. aart

    aart Chicken Juggler! Premium Member

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    My Coop
     
  6. pkrplyraa

    pkrplyraa New Egg

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    Jun 4, 2014
    girls are 2 1/2 years and the new rooster is 8 months.
    so far they are now coming out to eat treats that I give them. near each other but still in the isolated coop within the coop (cosco buy...well worth the money)
    They are no longer hiding each time he crows.
     
  7. chickens really

    chickens really Overrun With Chickens

    I would try letting him out....If no Blood is shed, they will work it out....You can always put him back into his pen if things get bad?




    Good luck


    Cheers!
     
  8. Ridgerunner

    Ridgerunner Chicken Obsessed

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    I’m kind of surprised at that reaction at those ages, I’d have expected the opposite. Mature hens often beat up on cockerels. But they are living animals, you just never know.

    I agree. Let them all out and see what happens. Chickens don’t like changes and this is a change, but they also adapt, sometimes quicker than others.

    What I’d expect to happen is that the cockerel will mate with one or more of the hens. That’s how he establishes dominance over them. For him to be flock master he has to be the dominant one, otherwise he can’t do his various jobs. Don’t be surprised if the hens run from him instead of squat and he physically forces them to submit. That is normal when a new rooster is introduced to a flock of hens. A lot of people not used to the process get really upset when he grabs their head. Don’t be. That’s a necessary part of the process.

    I’ll add something I wrote a while back on the mating process between consenting adults. It might give you an idea of what to expect. It’s possible yours will quickly go into consent mode but it is also possible some physical force will be involved for a while.

    The rooster dances for a specific hen. He lowers one wing and sort of circles her. This signals his intent.

    The hen squats. This gets her body onto the ground so the rooster’s weight goes into the ground through her entire body and not just her legs. That way she can support a much heavier rooster without hurting her legs.

    The rooster hops on and grabs the back of her head. The head grab helps him get in the right position to hit the target and helps him to keep his balance, but its major purpose is to tell the hen to raise her tail out of the way to expose the target. A mating will not be successful if she does not raise her tail and expose the target. The head grab is necessary.

    The rooster touches vents and hops off. This may be over in the blink of an eye or it may take a few seconds. But when this is over the rooster’s part is done.

    The hen then stands up, fluffs up, and shakes. This fluffy shake gets the sperm into a special container inside the hen near where the egg starts its internal journey through her internal egg making factory.
     
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  9. pkrplyraa

    pkrplyraa New Egg

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    Jun 4, 2014
    Thanks so much! I was good with the dancing, the prancing, the jumping and jabbing... I was a lot more concerned when he went for the neck! I put him back into his isolated coop in the run. So a day more of them looking at each other... then I let him out again. Knowing there will be a little blood and pain... I can do this. I really need this rooster to do his job. He will keep the girls from wandering and also get me some laying chicks for the future. He is young and full of himself. He is also a big boy! He is a Silkie that is twice the size as the girls.

    anyway, thanks and wish me luck!

    donna
     
  10. pkrplyraa

    pkrplyraa New Egg

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    Jun 4, 2014
    Update... and more advise is welcome...

    I checked in the coop at night and all the girls on the roost to the right... poor Max is all alone on the same roost to the left.
    One of my girls looks not right.. shaking her head, missing some tail feathers. I checked her out. No wounds just missing feathers. I could be wrong but it looks like she is not the top chick in the pecking order. I'll be keeping an eye on her for any further issues.

    The temp coop in the run, I leave the doors open and sometimes the girls go in and hide and sometimes the rooster. there is food and water in there as well.

    They have all but stopped laying eggs. one egg in 2 days. 5 girls and one egg. Definitely off. I gave them some yogurt today to try an pick them up. I took the girls out of the run and put them in my fenced raised bed to get some no-stress time.
    It appeared the rooster was not exactly happy with this but they are within seeing and calling distance.

    My coop is 5 x 8 x 6 feet high. The run is 12 x 8 by 8 feet high with chicken wire fence and a metal roof. I built a small bathing box for the girls inside the run.

    Not sure what to expect in the days to come.

    Any advise is welcome.

    thanks
     

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