How many Roos can I use?

Unerasable

In the Brooder
Feb 28, 2020
6
52
41
I have finally got my covetted Silver/Gray Dorking chicks. They are a month old as of this posting and I have some flock management questions that I'm sure you pros can help with.
My desire is to have a full-on, dual purpose flock that also propagates itself.
I have 24 birds, now. Nine, older, established chickens and 15 of my new Dorks with a few EE'ers thrown in for color.
My questions mainly concern my Roo population. I only want to breed the Dorks, so those are the only roos I will keep.
Question: Can/should I keep more than one Roo? If so, do I have to keep them separated? Can a flock be peaceful and productive with multiple roos strutting around?
20200529_125032.jpg
 

sourland

Broody Magician
Premium Feather Member
12 Years
May 3, 2009
121,247
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If all of your birds are to be maintained as one flock, given enough space I would keep at least two cockerels/roosters. One rooster can readily inseminate 10 hens. It might be a good idea to separate the flocks and periodically switch roosters to maintain genetic diversity.
 

Mrs. K

Free Ranging
11 Years
Nov 12, 2009
8,952
11,350
636
western South Dakota
Yes, it can work, but there is at least an equal chance it won't work the first time. I too agree, with what you want, eventually you will want two roosters. I would keep one rooster from this go around, in a year, if you are happy with the chicks, I would go back and get some straight run chicks, and raise them up in the flock, using your experience, the SOP and some time watching them to pick one of the rooster chicks to stay. Keep those two for a year.

Then if you want, cull the older gentleman, see what kind of flock master you get in the younger man, if you like then breed him. If not, order some more straight run chicks and try again.

Roosters are the easiest way to change the genetics and physical characterisitcs of your flock. A single rooster being added to an all hen flock is an easy add. A couple of rooster chicks being raised up in the flock can allow for some true chicken society to develop, and behaviors, weights, feet, beaks, coloring to be addressed and monitored.

Think of this as a long term hobby. Not you do it all this year. Breeding is fun, and ever so slow, but does make the hobby so interesting.

My main point, is it is not real likely that you are going to get two top quality roosters that grow up together and never fight the first time you get chicks. Work into this.

Mrs K
 

Unerasable

In the Brooder
Feb 28, 2020
6
52
41
Yes, it can work, but there is at least an equal chance it won't work the first time. I too agree, with what you want, eventually you will want two roosters. I would keep one rooster from this go around, in a year, if you are happy with the chicks, I would go back and get some straight run chicks, and raise them up in the flock, using your experience, the SOP and some time watching them to pick one of the rooster chicks to stay. Keep those two for a year.

Then if you want, cull the older gentleman, see what kind of flock master you get in the younger man, if you like then breed him. If not, order some more straight run chicks and try again.

Roosters are the easiest way to change the genetics and physical characterisitcs of your flock. A single rooster being added to an all hen flock is an easy add. A couple of rooster chicks being raised up in the flock can allow for some true chicken society to develop, and behaviors, weights, feet, beaks, coloring to be addressed and monitored.

Think of this as a long term hobby. Not you do it all this year. Breeding is fun, and ever so slow, but does make the hobby so interesting.

My main point, is it is not real likely that you are going to get two top quality roosters that grow up together and never fight the first time you get chicks. Work
Yes, it can work, but there is at least an equal chance it won't work the first time. I too agree, with what you want, eventually you will want two roosters. I would keep one rooster from this go around, in a year, if you are happy with the chicks, I would go back and get some straight run chicks, and raise them up in the flock, using your experience, the SOP and some time watching them to pick one of the rooster chicks to stay. Keep those two for a year.

Then if you want, cull the older gentleman, see what kind of flock master you get in the younger man, if you like then breed him. If not, order some more straight run chicks and try again.

Roosters are the easiest way to change the genetics and physical characterisitcs of your flock. A single rooster being added to an all hen flock is an easy add. A couple of rooster chicks being raised up in the flock can allow for some true chicken society to develop, and behaviors, weights, feet, beaks, coloring to be addressed and monitored.

Think of this as a long term hobby. Not you do it all this year. Breeding is fun, and ever so slow, but does make the hobby so interesting.

My main point, is it is not real likely that you are going to get two top quality roosters that grow up together and never fight the first time you get chicks. Work into this.

Mrs K
Thank you Mrs. K. The thought of putting time into this fine by me. Quality is my goal.
I like your philosophy. Thank you for responding
 

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