How much coop space?

Discussion in 'Geese' started by flockman, Jun 1, 2011.

  1. flockman

    flockman Chillin' With My Peeps

    1,185
    42
    163
    Nov 6, 2010
    Northern Indiana
    I am getting 8 goslings; 4 buff and 4 embden. I am planning on keeping 1 gander and one or two females. Pasture is not an issue. What I am wondering is how much space do I need for them to be closed in at night for shelter? I would keep the 8 geese till the 5 or 6 are ready to butcher. Thanks!
     
  2. rmonge00

    rmonge00 Chillin' With My Peeps

    I don't know the answer, but am also interested in this...
     
  3. Oneacre Homestead

    Oneacre Homestead Chillin' With My Peeps

    166
    2
    91
    May 25, 2011
    I read in a book 15 square feet per bird if they will be let out during the day, increase to 20 if will occasionally be left in.
     
  4. Denninmi

    Denninmi Chillin' With My Peeps

    1,867
    15
    171
    Jul 26, 2009
    Are you talking about a pen or about a shelter -- a pen I could see 15 square feet per bird. But, a shelter needs to be small, just enough room for them to squeeze in and turn around. That way, it will be able to be heated with just their body heat and stay warm. It needs to be well insulated but with a little ventilation and some sort of wind barrier. Same principles as making a dog house.
     
  5. rmonge00

    rmonge00 Chillin' With My Peeps

    I wanted to know how much space per bird if it is just a shelter and they will be free-ranging on two acres all day...
     
  6. Olive Hill

    Olive Hill Overrun With Chickens

    4,203
    74
    253
    Apr 19, 2009
    Quote:Not true. Geese do not like to "squeeze" together and -- because they're covered in down, one of nature's most efficient insulators -- they don't need to, either. Even in our northern winters they can and do comfortably sleep spread apart from one another. 15 square foot per bird for sleeping quarters is a pretty accurate recommendation for comfort. In fact, ours do not get locked up at night and 15 sq. ft. per adult bird is about what they choose to cover -- this year we overwintered 10, for instance, and they consistently sleep in about a 12x12 area.

    For a pen you would want considerably more than 15 sq ft per bird. Otherwise they would be living in a perpetual mud pit. Greens make up a major portion of a goose's diet and confining them in such a small space would cause problems to that end unless you were harvesting and providing fresh greens by hand several times daily.
     
  7. flockman

    flockman Chillin' With My Peeps

    1,185
    42
    163
    Nov 6, 2010
    Northern Indiana
    I was thinking more of the shelter than a pen. I have lots of space for the pen. The shelter was my question.
     
  8. Denninmi

    Denninmi Chillin' With My Peeps

    1,867
    15
    171
    Jul 26, 2009
    Quote:Not true. Geese do not like to "squeeze" together and -- because they're covered in down, one of nature's most efficient insulators -- they don't need to, either. Even in our northern winters they can and do comfortably sleep spread apart from one another. 15 square foot per bird for sleeping quarters is a pretty accurate recommendation for comfort. In fact, ours do not get locked up at night and 15 sq. ft. per adult bird is about what they choose to cover -- this year we overwintered 10, for instance, and they consistently sleep in about a 12x12 area.

    Ah, like my ducks. You can make them the best house in the world, but you can't really force them to use it. They'd rather just sleep out in the cold in the corner next to it. I gave up after a week or so trying to force them into doing something they didn't want to do. Even at 15 below, they didn't seem to care what the temp was.

    However, it makes me feel better knowing the house is there SHOULD they choose to ever want to use it -- never EVER saw a duck voluntarily enter it in it in 2 years, but hey, it's there.

    I'll make a goose house the same way, but they probably won't use it.
     
    Last edited: Jun 1, 2011
  9. Olive Hill

    Olive Hill Overrun With Chickens

    4,203
    74
    253
    Apr 19, 2009
    Quote:Not true. Geese do not like to "squeeze" together and -- because they're covered in down, one of nature's most efficient insulators -- they don't need to, either. Even in our northern winters they can and do comfortably sleep spread apart from one another. 15 square foot per bird for sleeping quarters is a pretty accurate recommendation for comfort. In fact, ours do not get locked up at night and 15 sq. ft. per adult bird is about what they choose to cover -- this year we overwintered 10, for instance, and they consistently sleep in about a 12x12 area.

    Ah, like my ducks. You can make them the best house in the world, but you can't really force them to use it. They'd rather just sleep out in the cold in the corner next to it. I gave up after a week or so trying to force them into doing something they didn't want to do. Even at 15 below, they didn't seem to care what the temp was.

    Yep, very much like ducks in that regard. Mine slept out without so much as a wind break all winter. They had wind breaks available, mind you. Just chose not to use them. Even in the blizzards and 30 below blowing wind we got. They'd sleep out on the ground, happy as clams. In the morning there'd be little bare goose patches with big drifts around them where they'd slept all night.
     
  10. Lamar Estate

    Lamar Estate Chillin' With My Peeps

    393
    7
    111
    Mar 3, 2011
    St. Paul, Minnesota
    I'm so confused. I'm in the beginning stage (someone is drawing draft ideas for me) of building my ducks' and goose's house and run. Everyone comes up with different numbers.

    I need a good rule of thumb!

    Please help.
     

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by