How much feed for 12 layers?

Discussion in 'Feeding & Watering Your Flock' started by Kelly Faulconer, May 28, 2012.

  1. ChickChickChicky

    ChickChickChicky Songster

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    Greater Kansas City, MO
    I got my first batch of chickens as adults, and they just seemed thin, always eating huge amounts of food without gaining weight, and got to where they weren't laying well. I hadn't really thought about chickens getting worms, but after I read something about it on here it made sense so I had their poop tested (BTW, you don't have to get a stool sample from every chicken... if one chicken has worms, rest assured that ALL of them do). Bingo, they had worms! I don't think you'd need to test them as babies (unless there are symptoms), but probably after age 5-6 months I'd test, and then at least once, and maybe twice, a year after that. Within 2 weeks of worming a chicken that has worms, you'll likely see increased egg laying, lowered food consumption, and what just seems like a happier bird. It just can't be a good thing to have a belly full of worms! I do remember reading a study that said that nearly 100% of chickens age 1 year or older had worms (can't find the study now unfortunately). As a guide,a laying hen should do well on about 1/4 pound of crumbles (or pellets) per day, any big variance from that needs to be explained. We do have a resident expert here on worming, dawg53, if you have any questions he's the go-to guy.
     
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  2. Yukonchick

    Yukonchick Songster

    Ya, apparently for laying hens, you're supposed to keep their feeder full all the time but with meat hens, you ration them or they'll eat themselves to death or get leg problems and won't be able to walk. Thats what they told me at the feed store anyway.
     
  3. Yukonchick

    Yukonchick Songster

    Ya, apparently for laying hens, you're supposed to keep their feeder full all the time but with meat hens, you ration them or they'll eat themselves to death or get leg problems and won't be able to walk. Thats what they told me at the feed store anyway. I'm getting 12 Red sussex for eggs and 30 Cornish meat birds tomorrow.
     
  4. Kelly Faulconer

    Kelly Faulconer In the Brooder

    Thanks. But one of our problems was that everyone does recommend the feed by lbs... who buys a scale to weigh chicken feed though. We have a cup size scoop and therefore kind of needed to know how cups people are feeding.. ya know?
     
  5. Kelly Faulconer

    Kelly Faulconer In the Brooder

    Thanks for all of the help and suggestions. We went with 6 cups for our 12 chicks starting 2 days ago... That seems to last a day. So thank you to the one who suggested a 1/2 cup a day.
     
  6. Auscal

    Auscal Songster

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    Oct 29, 2010
    A figure to start with is 4 oz per chicken per day.

    Weigh 4 oz on a kitchen scale - put this amount in your measure, then
    multiply that amount by 12 to get a daily ration. See how your birds do on this amount. If they are totally emptying their feeder before the end of the evening, try increasing just a little.
     
  7. Kelly Faulconer

    Kelly Faulconer In the Brooder

    hahahaha you just made me laugh Auscal but thanks for trying. We were looking for the simple easy way and that is just figuring out using cups since our scoop was about a cup. Someone recommended a 1/2 cup per chick a day and that I can do easily. We started on that 2 days ago and it is working quite well.

    We live a simple life here on our Post Oak land. I don't have a kitchen scale... just a scooper. :D
     
  8. Den in Penn

    Den in Penn Songster

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    Growing up I don't think there was a small weight scale with in a mile of the farm. With all the gadgets around today you can forget you may not really need them. A conversion chart for cups, gallons, bushels, or some other measure per pound feed would be neat.
     

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