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How much is normal price range?PIC ADDED

Discussion in 'Other Pets & Livestock' started by luvchicks8, Oct 2, 2010.

  1. luvchicks8

    luvchicks8 Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jul 1, 2009
    new Hampshire
    For a lilac colored sq holland lop kit?
     
    Last edited: Oct 2, 2010
  2. dbunni

    dbunni Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Nov 15, 2009
    Ohio
    if it is truly SQ ... $75 - $200 easy. We used to do HLs ... paid over $75 for a pedigree on non SQ doe. She gave us awsome animals!
     
  3. luvchicks8

    luvchicks8 Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jul 1, 2009
    new Hampshire
    Here is a picture of the bunny I want to purchase what would proper price be? Only 5-6 weeks right now.
    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Oct 2, 2010
  4. dbunni

    dbunni Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Nov 15, 2009
    Ohio
    From the picture presented, I would not purchase this animal... the ears are up and show a fold! The ears on a good headed SQ HL will drop very, very early! And a folded ear is often a sign of an improper ear structure. I'd also question his/her coat. is there a fuzzy gene in the pedigree? Body looks a little long. You should get a good pix of it posed up properly. The head should sit on a strong round body... up proud. We started them early and the good ones did it naturally. Have her/him take a pix when the bunny is relaxed in the cage with mommy. But, I would not, at this point, purchase the bunny.

    If you truly are interested ... I would say $25-$35. Nice little pet.
     
    Last edited: Oct 2, 2010
  5. luvchicks8

    luvchicks8 Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jul 1, 2009
    new Hampshire
    Quote:thanks:) Do you know anthing about ruby eyed whites? I got these 2 for free I am looking for 1 more rabbit for showing which is why I am looking at the lilac for my youngest son.

    Here is a picture but he is only 5 weeks old in this picture.
    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Oct 2, 2010
  6. dbunni

    dbunni Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Nov 15, 2009
    Ohio
    These are HLs also? The body is stronger/rounder length than the first animal. But the hips look to be pinched (narrowed compared to the rest of the bunny). But the ears! Mine dropped at 3-4 weeks. By 5 they were pretty well situated around the face. The pix was at 5 weeks ... how do the ears sit right now? If they have "a lot of control" then the crown is probably not going to be what you would like. As for REW ... it is just a color pattern. My suggestion would be to go to a show and get an opinion from one of the judges. You don't especially have to show, just ask someone to grade the baby for you. Pictures can often hide what the hands can feel.
     
  7. Bunnylady

    Bunnylady POOF Goes the Pooka

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    Nov 27, 2009
    Wilmington, NC
    luvchicks8, you need to find a judge/registrar/breeder that you can trust, and get them to teach you how to size up a rabbit. It seems to me that the person you are dealing with either doesn't know Hollands very well, or is counting on you not knowing them.

    The first bunny doesn't look lilac to me, it looks like a slightly sunbleached blue. It appears to have a nice profile, but I agree with everything dbunni said about it. Holland Lops are posed sitting up, like a dog sits. The good ones sit like that naturally. The ones that tend to hunker down are called "rug munchers" by a couple of breeders that I know, lol. While you can teach one of them to sit properly, they usually have weak shoulders or other defects that won't let them do well on a show table. By 5 weeks, the rabbit should have ears that are down most of the time. A truly SQ Holland shouldn't be able to get both ears over its back at the same time, most of the good ones can't lift much past horizontal by this age.

    Judging a rabbit is a very "hands-on" process. Because they are so fuzzy, you really can't tell a lot from a picture. The pose can make or break the rabbit - I remember an article in Domestic Rabbit where the author presented three pictures, and asked readers to place the rabbits in a hypothetical class. At the end of the article, it was revealed that the three pictures were all the same rabbit (a New Zealand White), just posed slightly differently in each shot. It's funny how just placing the feet slightly forward or back of the ideal position could make a grand champion doe look long and flat, or chopped off. You need to set them up properly, and then let your hands tell you what is going on beneath the fur.

    In most rabbit breeds, the vast majority of points are awarded for type. I'll have to check to be sure, but I think something around 50% of the points for a Holland are awarded for things that happen in front of the shoulders. In the Harlequin breed, the majority of the points are awarded for markings. Because of that, a lot of breeders concentrate on the markings, and pay little attention to the type of their breeding stock. A lot of Harlies are scarecrows under those wild markings. I remember putting a buck with only adequate markings, but a great body, on a show table one time. The judge bred meat rabbits, and his disdain for our breed was evident. When he got to my buck, he looked him over, set him up, ran his hands over him, and the expression on his face changed radically! He was shocked to find a Harlie with a body like that, but he didn't know it was there until he felt it. Knowing the point breakdown, he had to put my buck in third place, but he told me "if they were judged by type, as they should be, I'd have given him BOB."
     
  8. luvchicks8

    luvchicks8 Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jul 1, 2009
    new Hampshire
    Thansk for all your advise I am clueless about rabbit standards. My son wants to show rabbit's along with his poultry so I can use all the advise I can get.
     

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