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How much ventilation?

Discussion in 'Coop & Run - Design, Construction, & Maintenance' started by imaleomom, Aug 15, 2008.

  1. imaleomom

    imaleomom Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Aug 4, 2008
    SC
    We are in the planning stages of building our coop and we are curious about how everyone feels about the amount of ventilation required?
    For what it is worth, we are located in the SE corner of SC. Hot summers and chilly (no snow) winters.
     
  2. hatchcrazzzy

    hatchcrazzzy Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jun 8, 2007
    kemp texas
    i have a 8 by 12 coop and i have 2 windows for ventalation
     
  3. Davaroo

    Davaroo Poultry Crank

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    Feb 4, 2007
    Leesville, SC
    I can sum it up in one word: More.

    Here in SC, you really only need to offer protection from the rain, hot sun and occasional cold weather. I know lots of people here around Aiken that dont house their chickens at all.

    Do yourself a favor and look to a strong hoop house sort of design.
     
  4. patandchickens

    patandchickens Flock Mistress

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    Apr 20, 2007
    Ontario, Canada
    THE EASY WAY: design in "way plenty" ventilation -- more than enough -- and shut some flaps (or whatever) in cool or rainy weather.

    THE HARD AND AGGRAVATING WAY: build limited ventilation, then decide in January that you have insufficient ventilation, and either deal with chickens with respiratory illnesses or (if you catch it in time) drag the ol' Sawzall out to the coop to chop big raggedy holes in it.

    Personally, I would recommend the easy way [​IMG]

    In a southern climate, it's probably best if much or most of 3 or 4 walls can open up. Flaps/doors can cover 'em when the weather warrants. Make separate long narrow vents up under the eaves that can be left open in most any weather.

    Good luck and have fun,

    Pat
     

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