How to classify your eggs

Discussion in 'Local Chicken Laws & Ordinances (and how to change' started by livin-green, Feb 13, 2009.

  1. livin-green

    livin-green Chillin' With My Peeps

    342
    2
    141
    Apr 17, 2008
    Clay, Alabama
    I'm trying to determine what to charge for my eggs. We have 14 chickens--6 leghorns, 4 cochins, & 4 brahmas, and we are currently getting anywhere from 9 to 12 eggs a day--all large with the exception of 1 or 2! Way above my expectations! I now have eggs coming out my ears and am thinking of selling them by word-of-mouth. I have been trying to research the "going" price in our area, but it is hard to know unless I classify my eggs. So, long explanation made short--how would you classify these eggs?

    Chickens are kept in an enclosed run/coop. It is an 8'x8' coop with a 12' x 25' run (size approximate). We would like to free-range, but predators prevent this. The run is now barren of any "greens", but they can--of course--munch on any insect that may find its way in.

    They always have access to vegetarian layer crumbles mixed with a small amount of 3-grain scratch (cracked corn, whole milo, whole wheat). I throw several handfuls of scratch mixed with a small amount of oatmeal in the chicken daily--mainly to keep them busy!

    In addition, they are fed a montage of "treats": old--but not spoiled--vegetables and fruit, greens (romaine hearts, spinach, or similar greens), yogurt fairly regularly and usually mixed with cooked rice or oatmeal, and lots of leftovers (avoiding anything excessively salty, sugary or spicy). On occasion, I even pick up a couple dozen crickets from the pet store (we have to get them for our lizard anyway).

    Sorry this is so long, but I'm trying to give enough detail for you all to advise. Thanks in advance!
     
    Last edited: Feb 13, 2009
  2. what was i thinking

    what was i thinking Chillin' With My Peeps

    Oct 1, 2008
    cny ny
    farm fresh and i get $2 a dozen. at first people thought that was alot. now i can't keep up with the people at work. i didn't really tell to many people. i would walk into the break room to deliver some and then someone would ask.
    there are alot of threads on price to charge. you can look them up and read thru a couple. i think mine is fair.
     
  3. Zoomom

    Zoomom Certified Cackleberry Consumer

    383
    3
    134
    Jan 22, 2009
    Ontario, Canada
    $2 a dozen, wow, that is what we pay for the cheapest crappiest grocery store eggs. Here, at the grocery store the Omega 3 eggs are $3-4 a doz.
    Farm fresh are usually $3 a doz, I only know one place that sells for $2 and they are isolated in a barn, no outside area. That farm supplies the stores. They have a huge number of hens from the size of the barns but I've never been able to see inside.
    For organically fed, free range, farm fresh they are $4 to $6 a dozen. People pay $6 in Toronto because you can't get them so nice otherwise.
    I pay $4 for organically fed free range farm fresh right now, with the occasional half dozens for free, and when she doesn't have enough for me I can get regularly fed farm fresh for $2.50 from someone else.
     
  4. livin-green

    livin-green Chillin' With My Peeps

    342
    2
    141
    Apr 17, 2008
    Clay, Alabama
    I've checked some people's prices in our area, and most are $3.00/dozen. Most of them a called free range, but I don't think mine would be considered free range...?? I saw a few threads on here regarding this, but I'm not sure what most people would call our eggs--free range, organic, or just farm fresh???

    I'm thinking I will have to just say farm fresh at $2.50/dozen.

    I'm not currently feeding flax, so I guess they can't be considered rich in Omega-3. Flax is so expensive that I just can't do that right now.
     
  5. ArizonaDesertChicks

    ArizonaDesertChicks Eggstactic for Pretty Eggs

    2,378
    18
    199
    Dec 8, 2008
    Glendale, AZ
    I would classify them as cage-free since they have a huge run to scratch around in, run in, flap their wings, dustbathe, etc., and are able to roost at night & lay in nestboxes (none of this is available to caged chickens). You can also say the eggs are fresh, as long as your state laws allow it (ours doesn't). In your ad, you can also state that your chickens are fed fresh greens daily (or frequently, whichever the case).

    As for price, it varies a lot depending on your location. Here in Arizona, homegrown eggs are selling for $3 a dozen. Check your local craiglist for "eggs" and see what prices people are asking. It's also supply and demand and whether people in your area will pay more for cage-free, fresh eggs. I always buy the cage-free eggs at the store, but my dad always buys the cheapest he can find.
     
  6. livin-green

    livin-green Chillin' With My Peeps

    342
    2
    141
    Apr 17, 2008
    Clay, Alabama
    Yes, that sounds like a good classification--didn't think of that one! ;-)

    Thanks for the input! $3.00/dozen is the going rate around here for "organic" or "free range" eggs, but since mine aren't either, I figured I'd go with $2.50/dz
     
  7. ArizonaDesertChicks

    ArizonaDesertChicks Eggstactic for Pretty Eggs

    2,378
    18
    199
    Dec 8, 2008
    Glendale, AZ
    Your 14 cage-free chickens are living in a HUGE 300 sf pen and get fruit, greens, treats, etc., probably living much better than the majority of store bought cage free and free-range hens. If you wanted to ask the going rate of $3, you shouldn't feel guilty. But if you want to stick with the $2.50, I'm sure you'll make a lot of people happy and your chickens will still be earning their keep.
     
  8. FrenchHen

    FrenchHen Chicken Ambassador

    Jan 26, 2009
    Bagshot Row
    If I remember correctly, free range means the chickies have access to the outdoors at their leisure.

    I think that's what I read in Omnivore's Dilemma.
     
  9. vermontgal

    vermontgal Chillin' With My Peeps

    To me, cage-free means that the chickens are crammed into a space where ... yeah, they technically aren't in cages but they may as well be.

    I think I'd be a little wordy and call your chickens:

    From backyard chickens: raised by real people, fed real food and treats

    or

    Humanely raised, handled and fed.


    $3 seems like a fine price based on your local market if you have good eggs -- healthy shells, good quality nicely orangy yokes.

    (Here, $3.50 would be a good price.)
     
  10. livin-green

    livin-green Chillin' With My Peeps

    342
    2
    141
    Apr 17, 2008
    Clay, Alabama
    Well, I haven't told anyone $2.50, yet, so I guess I could do $3.00/dz and see how it goes.

    Slightly changing the subject, I wasn't going to really advertise my eggs--I was planning to sell them more by word-of-mouth. Does anyone know if you have to have any kind of license, etc., to sell eggs? I have never sold anything "from the farm" (i.e., eggs, veggies), so I have no idea how that works. Any tips on who I may need to contact would be great!
     

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by