How to prevent frostbite?

Annalyse

Songster
Mar 24, 2020
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New Jersey
I heard you can put vaseline on there combs and wattle but I know my rooster wont let me pick him up to do that and some of my hens wouldnt. Plus i have a beared silkie so any other ideas?
 

DobieLover

Easily distracted by chickens
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Jul 23, 2018
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My Coop
I heard you can put vaseline on there combs and wattle but I know my rooster wont let me pick him up to do that and some of my hens wouldnt. Plus i have a beared silkie so any other ideas?
Keep your coop very well ventilated and DRY and the flock should be fine.
Any product put on the comb/wattles must have a freezing point above the expected lows or it will just freeze on the skin and cause frostbite.
 

Annalyse

Songster
Mar 24, 2020
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New Jersey
Keep your coop very well ventilated and DRY and the flock should be fine.
Any product put on the comb/wattles must have a freezing point above the expected lows or it will just freeze on the skin and cause frostbite.
Okay thank you. What will frostbite look like? I want to be able to point it out right away and not just a scab or cut the others did or something.
 

Mrs. K

Free Ranging
Nov 12, 2009
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Dry is the most important. When I have tended to get frostbite, (we live in an arid area) was when it had been cold, as below freezing for several days, and then get a big warm up. The manurer thawed, releasing moisture, and the warmer air holds more moisture, and a sharp freeze that night equals frostbite.

Damp chickens are cold chickens. Keep the manure broken up in the coop. Sprinkle the top of the bedding with scratch once a week or so, the girls will turn the bedding for you, breaking up the manure with their scratching, and it will dry out.

Dry is way more important than putting something on them.

It will look like black dots or spots. The points of combs tend to freeze off. I generally do not touch it, and it heals up on it's own.

Mrs K
 

Annalyse

Songster
Mar 24, 2020
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New Jersey
Dry is the most important. When I have tended to get frostbite, (we live in an arid area) was when it had been cold, as below freezing for several days, and then get a big warm up. The manurer thawed, releasing moisture, and the warmer air holds more moisture, and a sharp freeze that night equals frostbite.

Damp chickens are cold chickens. Keep the manure broken up in the coop. Sprinkle the top of the bedding with scratch once a week or so, the girls will turn the bedding for you, breaking up the manure with their scratching, and it will dry out.

Dry is way more important than putting something on them.

It will look like black dots or spots. The points of combs tend to freeze off. I generally do not touch it, and it heals up on it's own.

Mrs K
Thank you. So smug they do get frostbite especially my rooster since his. omb and wattle are bigger than him lol. Do I just leave it alone and not do anything while it keeps getting cold or should I bring him in and keep it warm? Idk
 

Fentress60

Hatching
Aug 15, 2020
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This all about your coop. Cozy is bad. Even if you think /have good ventilation. Chickens create a lot of moisture with their breath. You need plenty of room in the coop, especially above their heads, so the moisture can get away from them. Check out Fresh Air Poultry Houses by Dr. Prince (not sure about name)if your chickens stay dry the temp is not an issue. Good luck
 

Annalyse

Songster
Mar 24, 2020
640
560
141
New Jersey
This all about your coop. Cozy is bad. Even if you think /have good ventilation. Chickens create a lot of moisture with their breath. You need plenty of room in the coop, especially above their heads, so the moisture can get away from them. Check out Fresh Air Poultry Houses by Dr. Prince (not sure about name)if your chickens stay dry the temp is not an issue. Good luck
Thank you I will
 

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