How to safely heat ducks

TracyLovesDucks

Songster
5 Years
Mar 25, 2014
527
36
138
Northern Colorado
Hello everyone, I'm hoping you will have some good insights on heating ducks.

My ducks are 6-7 weeks old and are living outside in their barn. Here in Colorado, the weather is volatile during the spring, and nights can still drop below freezing. I have been keeping an infrared heat lamp (250W) on them and an extra one (125W) when it's really cold. Plus we are getting more ducklings which will need heat when they are moved into the barn with the older ones.

I am SOO PARANOID AND WORRIED about these bulbs shattering. The ducks still have access to water at night which I worry most about... if the cool water hits the bulb. Also, I hear these bulbs shatter without explanation sometimes too. If it were to happen, so much could go wrong (shards could cut them, they could eat the glass pieces if I don't find it in time, etc.). (1) What are some safer alternatives that you use?

I have given some thought to modifying the lamp, with something like a wire mesh shield that could catch most of the glass were the bulb to shatter. (2) Has anyone done this?

We are also hoping to keep the ducks laying through the winter with added heat, so I need a super-safe way of doing so. (3) What are your thoughts on that in general?

Sorry, it's a lot of questions. Thanks for all of your responses!!!
 
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azelgin

Songster
12 Years
Jan 18, 2008
1,277
50
193
S.E. AZ
There's been some discussion on another thread, regarding using these:

http://www.ebay.com/itm/Black-150W-...060?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item1e810671ac

The price is less than I've paid for the glass heat lamps.
Looks like a good alternative and I think I will probably switch over to them, even though I've never had a problem with the standard heat bulbs. The heat lamps are fragile and my biggest complaint is that the bulb separates from the brass base. I've never had one shatter, in using them for several years. Same with their use in household bathrooms.

As for winter laying, that will be light dependent, not heat. Longer days = more eggs. At least that's the way it works with chickens.
 
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TracyLovesDucks

Songster
5 Years
Mar 25, 2014
527
36
138
Northern Colorado
Thanks Azelgin. I was also considering the ceramic heat emitters, I think it would work well for the brooder. But I read somewhere on the chicken forum that the heat from these is only emitted about 4 inches (this person tested one under a desk and couldn't feel any heat except for up close). I guess it's worth trying out anyways because I think it would be a nice solution.

And I think you're right about light having more to do with laying rather than heat.
 
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