How to tame a goat?

Discussion in 'Other Pets & Livestock' started by Leah567, Apr 24, 2017.

  1. Leah567

    Leah567 Hopelessly Addicted Premium Member

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    How could I tame a goat? I already tried treats and hand feeding but its not working so good. He won't even come near you so I can't sit near him or anything!
     
  2. LearninMyFlock

    LearninMyFlock Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Once again I don't feel qualified to answer as I'm looking for those answers myself. The last time we went to see our kids we sat outside the fence and handed treats in. The bigger ones ate it but the kids at least got close enough we could touch them. One time we just went into the pasture and quietly just sat on the grass. They are far from tame yet but at least they can get used to our presence. The owner of them now, said that for leading it takes time every day for 3months. So I'm guessing they are not a fast and easy win over. I'm door hoping they soon tame up to us tho! :)
     
  3. Leah567

    Leah567 Hopelessly Addicted Premium Member

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    Thank you!!
     
  4. Leah567

    Leah567 Hopelessly Addicted Premium Member

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    I'll try that!
     
  5. LearninMyFlock

    LearninMyFlock Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Hope it helps! My idea (and don't know yet if it will work) is that if I just sit in their pasture they'll eventually get used to my prescence and allow me to approach them without being skittish. With the treats. ..I didn't bring mine home yet, So the does all come after the treats but at least it introduces our little guys to us. I hope yours soon tame down also!
     
  6. Leah567

    Leah567 Hopelessly Addicted Premium Member

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    I think they will thank you!
     
  7. Zoomie

    Zoomie Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Are you able to catch the goat at all? Perhaps close the barn door etc? Or maybe get some friends and get him cornered, or something? If so... here is what I do with a Wild Child. I put a collar on them, and I attach a long cotton rope with a swivel snap (that part is important: it has to be a snap with a swivel). It should be cotton rope as it does not give rope burns, to either you or the goat, and is safer. Approach the goat but make sure to **step on the rope** first. With a nice long rope, you can be 30' away, and step on the rope and walk up it very slowly, talking very calmly the whole time. Just be patient and calm. Once near by, get down on your knees or sit down and offer some hay or grass etc. You might have to sit there patiently for a while, because it might take them some time to realize the food is there and you are not going to hurt them. If they eat the food, hooray, you can start to offer your hand for them to sniff and just again be patient and calm and proceed slowly. Back away from them the same way, patient and slow, standing on the rope. Give them lots of time to think. Do this over and over. Eventually they learn that you won't hurt them and that they don't need to run away, and that you will feed them special treats. What I do is put them in a stall or some very small pen at night (I do it to keep them safe from dogs) and depending on your pen or stall, it may or may not be safe to leave the rope on. If not, take it off at night. But, if the goat is in a stall or small pen, you should be able to catch them in the morning to attach the rope again. My stall is VERY safe, there is nothing in there for a rope to catch on or wrap around, so I can leave the rope on and "catch" them in the morning, and lead them out to breakfast. Before long they understand and accept humans and are OK with them.

    When you are doing this training, you must be sure to be home to watch the goat and make certain they do not get into trouble with the rope. If you must leave, put them in the stall or pen first so they will be safe. My house and barn are set up so that I can easily observe the goats from most of the windows in the house. I do this so that I can observe any attacks on my goats, if they are not feeling well, if they are close to birth etc. but it is also good for if I had to train one to not be scared. That has not been an issue for me for a long time, because I hand raise all my kids now. As a result they are all extremely friendly and love people. If they ever "escape" they simply run right up to me as soon as they see me.

    I wish you the best of luck with your new goat friend.
     
  8. Leah567

    Leah567 Hopelessly Addicted Premium Member

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    Thank you so much!!
     
  9. LearninMyFlock

    LearninMyFlock Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Just curious how it's going with your kid? We brought ours home on Sat! So far no problems:) they are rather shy yet but that is really changing as we spend time with them each day.
     
  10. Leah567

    Leah567 Hopelessly Addicted Premium Member

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    Oh they are great!!! Our boy one isn't shy at all anymore!!! Its so awesome! If you walk in the pen and sit down he jumps right in your lap! He's so loving now!
     

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