How Water Resistent Are 6 Week Goslings?

Discussion in 'Geese' started by wildpeas, May 21, 2012.

  1. wildpeas

    wildpeas Songster

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    Mar 18, 2012
    Port Orchard, Wa
    My embdens are outside right now and its raining non-stop. They have a shelter of sorts they can get under and its dry under the eaves of our house. Do I need to worry about them getting too wet at this age? What about getting cold? They have a lot of their feathers but I dont think they have all of them yet. Is it ok to leave them out all day?
     
  2. Going Bhonkers

    Going Bhonkers Songster

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    Apr 12, 2012
    SW Florida
    I'm new to geese, but I've still bring my 6 weeks old in from the rain, mainly because as you said, they're still getting their feathers.
    Of course it has also rained close to the evening and their outside shelter/ coop isn't fully predator proof yet. We might start leaving them out there once its finished, regardless if they're fully feathered, but they'll still be covered from direct rain.

    I'd like to read what others with more experience have to say
     
    Last edited: May 21, 2012
  3. MotherGoose 777

    MotherGoose 777 In the Brooder

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    Dec 25, 2009
    If the weather is very warm and they have a place to get dry if they want to, I would leave 6 week old goslings out in a light rain. A heavy downpour I generally brought them in (if I'm raising them myself). I've noticed the parent-raised ones being treated the same. It's always pretty warm here by the time goslings hatch, so I can't comment on what parent geese do in cooler weather.

    If it were me, I'd want to bring them in if it were cool though, since the down feathers don't shed water well and they can get really soaked. I'd probably factor in wind too ... if it's very windy I'd be more likely to bring them in.

    BTW, I'd say the same for swimming. I only allow swimming for brief periods in warm weather before they get their feathers in, and you have to watch that they don't drown. Same for ducklings. But once they are fully feathered (a few weeks older than yours), I don't do anything special to protect them from being wet. Again, I've always raised them when it's already warm.

    Geese are pretty tough though, and don't need to be protected NEARLY as much as baby chicks. I just don't like to see them wet to the skin for more than a brief swim (maybe 30 minutes).
     

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