Humidity advice?

Discussion in 'Incubating & Hatching Eggs' started by ShayBaby, Sep 14, 2013.

  1. ShayBaby

    ShayBaby Chillin' With My Peeps

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    So I just set 19 shipped eggs. All are tiny bantam eggs. All but 2 are very porous. (One shell cracked a bit..my mistake. Put nail polish on and hoped for the best.)
    What humidity would seasoned hatchers recommend for small, highly porous eggs? I usually dry hatch around 25-30, but I'm not sure what eggs like this need. They would be more likely to lose moisture quicker, right? I have the humidity at 50 at the moment to be safe until I figure it out, but being a dry-hatcher, I feel that's way too high.
     
  2. Wyandottes7

    Wyandottes7 Overrun With Chickens

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    When I hatch small bantam eggs (some of which are porous), I keep the humidity during the first eighteen days of incubation at 50-60%. During the last three days, I raise it to about 70%.

    I've never done incubation any different, so I don't know if bantam eggs would be fine with lower humidity. This is just what I do, and it works for me.
     
  3. chickengeorgeto

    chickengeorgeto Overrun With Chickens

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    It should work for everyone because this is close to now commercial hatcheries handle their eggs. They normally enjoy a pipping rate in the low 90% range, and have few deformed and still born chicks. After 18 days in a forced air incubator and the final 3 days in a dedicated hatcher set @ 70% humidity your chicks should pop out of their shells like they are fuzzy popcorn.
    [​IMG]

    I know, to some of you this looks rougher than chicken sex but believe me when I say that chickens are many times tougher, stronger, and more resilient than you think that they are.

    As an example of this. Original scientific research indicates that wood duck chicks hatched 50 feet or higher in a hollow tree and who then are forced to take the long plunge to Earth, bouncing from pillow to post or limb to limb just to reach the ground and keep up with their mother, live longer, grow faster, and do better than the wood duck chicks the same mama wood duck hatches out in a man made wood duck box. These latter chicks can just step out their front door like a scuba diver going for a swim and they only fall 6 feet or so to the water below. It could well be that the hatchery is doing these chicks a favor by handling them in this rough way.
     
    Last edited: Sep 14, 2013
  4. ShayBaby

    ShayBaby Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Thanks for the responses. I'm just concerned with the porosity of these guys. I'll keep the humidity high and hope for the best.
     
  5. yinepu

    yinepu Overrun With Chickens


    go with dry incubation for the beginning.. then candle the eggs at day 7 and check the air cells. Adjust the humidity IF the air cells are getting too big too fast

    Let the eggs be your guide.. since the porosity is a concern the eggs will tell you if they need higher or lower humidity

    [​IMG]

    the line by the day of incubation is where the bottom of the air cell should be on that day of incubation
     
  6. yinepu

    yinepu Overrun With Chickens

     

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