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Hygrometer for hatching eggs? Candling?

Discussion in 'Incubating & Hatching Eggs' started by gotpotbellypig, Sep 25, 2013.

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  1. gotpotbellypig

    gotpotbellypig Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Mar 27, 2012
    Las Vegas, Nevada
    Ok, so I posted a forum a little bit ago and got tons of help. But, one things that I'm still not sure of is how to measure the humidity level correctly. It is supposed to be round 65-70%, correct? Do you even need a hygrometer? I read about putting flat rocks at the bottom of the water slots along with food coloring so you know when you need to refill the water. Rocks are supposed to store heat I guess. During the "lock down period" are you supposed to bump up the humidity level to 75-80%?

    Candling is another big thing. Every day, once a week? I have a sheet printed out on the stages and stuff but how long can you keep the eggs out of the incubator?

    Thanks! [​IMG]
     
  2. BantamLover21

    BantamLover21 Overrun With Chickens

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    Jul 24, 2013
    If the incubator can contain one,I keep a wet-bulb thermometer (or an electric hygrometer/thermometer) in the incubator so that I know how humid it is. But if not, I fill the water trays/slots one-quarter to one-half way and hope that the humidity level is correct. I simply add more water to the trays during lockdown. While humidity level is critical, the exact percentages can vary somewhat without harming the hatchability of the eggs; it is not an exact science.

    For chicken eggs at least (the proper humidity varies depending on the type of bird being hatched), it is best if the humidity is 45-50% during the first 18 days of incubation. During "lockdown", I keep the humidity at around 65-75%, but it can be anywhere from 65-85%.

    As for candling, I candle at 7 days, 14 days, and at 18 days. The cooling during candling won't harm the embryos as long as it isn't frigid outside the incubator and they aren't kept out for more than 30 minutes.
     
  3. gotpotbellypig

    gotpotbellypig Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Mar 27, 2012
    Las Vegas, Nevada
    Thanks so much!
     
  4. Framac

    Framac Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I keep my humidity between 30-50% from 1-18, then try to get it over 65 for 18+. My Genesis has a humidity gauge, and I have a digital for the hatcher.

    As I don't need the space, and what not, I candle at 9 and 18. If space was an issue, i'd candle weekly.

    The hen when she hatches gets off the nest everyday, so I would not worry to much about opening the bator for 20-30 minutes.
     

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