I have a limping roo

Discussion in 'Where am I? Where are you!' started by Granny Hoffman, Aug 1, 2013.

  1. Granny Hoffman

    Granny Hoffman Chillin' With My Peeps

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    129
    Jul 19, 2010
    SE Michigan
    I posted this in the emergencies thread but you all have such a wealth of information I thought I would post here also.

    We have a 2 year old Splash Jersey Giant roo that is limping badly. He can't walk, it has been 4 days. I have him separated in his own lil coop where he can see his girls and get to food and water. He is eating and drinking and crowing fine, but can't walk. I'm not sure what else I can do. I have examined his leg and find no swelling, heat or when in manipulate his leg he doesn't act like it hurts, just can't put any weight on it. He is our favorite roo and I am hoping the outcome will be a good one, but I'm not sure how long I should wait to see if he will be able to heal.

    Any and all help will be appreciated.

    Judy
     
  2. cafarmgirl

    cafarmgirl Overrun With Chickens

    Have you checked the bottom of his feet for bumblefoot? A small wound or cut will close over and develop a core. You'll usually see a black scab or spot in the center of it.

    If the bottom of the feet are clear he may also have sprained or injured himself coming off the roost perhaps? I have an older hen who went lame on me about a week ago. I've been giving her a crushed up baby aspirin morning and night for the last week and she is slowly improving.
     
  3. Granny Hoffman

    Granny Hoffman Chillin' With My Peeps

    250
    1
    129
    Jul 19, 2010
    SE Michigan
    The bottoms of his feet are clear. Thank you for the suggestion of the baby aspirin. How do you administer the baby aspirin?
     
  4. cafarmgirl

    cafarmgirl Overrun With Chickens

    I crush it up between two spoons and carefully pour it into a 3 cc needless syringe. Stick the plunger in and then draw up a couple cc's of water or buttermilk. The buttermilk works really well, they like it and it helps buffer the aspirin. Then give it orally and carefully! A little at a time and let the bird swallow each time. You don't want them aspirating anything. I have somebody hold the bird for me while I give the meds. Good luck with your boy, hope he improves!
     

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