I HAVE QUESTIONS

kaythlin

Chirping
Oct 28, 2017
89
94
91
Hello, I just wanted some extra tips and things to help me. I got this large incubator (still air). And I wanted to know if anyone had any recommendations. I have good experience with care of baby chicks ducks and grown but what I really need tips on is incubating. Here are simple questions I'm not here for you to state the obvious I just need a bit of help.

1 What happens if the eggs overheat

2 What happens if you don't add humidity

3 Will not turning them kill or make them not hatch

4 I have 6 rosters and 3 hens currently together in a coop (for these eggs) so on a scale of 20 how many is likely to be firtlized.

5 Do the rosters fertilize all year round.

6 Also a wierd thing my hens never get broody like ever so I had to take matters into my own hands. They seem to not care.

7 tips and tricks?
Please answer like this
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BullChick

Wrangler
Premium Feather Member
9 Years
Apr 17, 2012
45,685
86,176
1,547
Coffee shop in zone 5
Hello, I just wanted some extra tips and things to help me. I got this large incubator (still air). And I wanted to know if anyone had any recommendations. I have good experience with care of baby chicks ducks and grown but what I really need tips on is incubating. Here are simple questions I'm not here for you to state the obvious I just need a bit of help.

1 What happens if the eggs overheat
They cook. Above 105° , they are goners. Although, the inside of the egg takes longer to heat up than the outside.
2 What happens if you don't add humidity
If the natural humidity is not high enough, the chicks will get stuck inside of their shells and/or die.
3 Will not turning them kill or make them not hatch
Yes. They will stick to the side.
4 I have 6 rosters and 3 hens currently together in a coop (for these eggs) so on a scale of 20 how many is likely to be firtlized.
Please get rid of two roosters. They will kill the hens by overnating.
Most eggs will probably be fertilized.
5 Do the rosters fertilize all year round.
No. Fertility drops drastically over the winter.
6 Also a wierd thing my hens never get broody like ever so I had to take matters into my own hands. They seem to not care.
Some hands never will. It has been bred out of them. Also, stress can keep them off the nest.
7 tips and tricks
Please answer like this
Example
# : answer
Go to “educational incubating and hatching” There are links in the first post to answer every question you can or can’t think of.
 

Rose Quartz

Enabler
Mar 18, 2018
2,603
62,801
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East Hants N.S. Canada
1) it depends how hot... but basically they begin to cook their blood veins will deteriorate and burst.

2) I don't add humidity until day 18. I watch my aircells though. you are looking for the aircell to grow to a certain size by a certain day.
air cell size.gif

3) turning the eggs both keeps the embryo from sticking to the shell, and it strengthens it. Not turning will likely kill the chicks. Earliest I have stopped turning was day 16 and I had all but one pip in the wrong spot.

:D
 

diamondsilkies

Songster
Oct 23, 2017
713
1,193
181
Southern Arizona
1. If the eggs overheat too much, it can kill chicks, but one or two degrees shouldn't be too much of an issue.

2. I'm not sure on the exact consequences of not adding humidity, but I know that you need both a warm and humid environment to hatch chicks. Hopefully someone more experienced with that aspect will come along.

3. Not turning the eggs can lower the hatch rate, as the embryo tends to stick to the side of the egg and not develop properly.

4. I would be surprised if more than 1 or 2 are not fertilized, that's a large rooster to hen ratio. In fact, I would recommend moving some of the roosters to other coops if you have them or selling them. Too many roosters can injure or stress out the hens.

5. Yes

6. What breeds do have? Certain breeds have been bred not to be broody. Breeds like silkies, australorps, and cochins tend to go broody a lot. Of course, it depends on the individual hen. I've had silkies that never went broody and silkies that started going broody at 7 months old and continued to do so every month.

Hope this helps! Good luck with your hatch.
 

sylviethecochin

Free Ranging
Jun 14, 2017
5,499
11,305
701
Central PA
1 What happens if the eggs overheat
They die if it's too much. If it doesn't kill them, it generally just moves the hatching date back towards you a bit. But there's no set formula as to how much will kill them. It greatly depends on the sort of eggs and how well-incubated they were beforehand.

2 What happens if you don't add humidity
You need it during lockdown or your chicks get shrink-wrapped and can't get out of the shells. They die.

During the first 2.5 weeks, humidity helps them retain the water weight that they lose through the shell. If they don't get enough, they're dehydrated. Think about the effects of dehydration on athletes. Not good. If you're lower in altitude (thicker air) you won't have as much to worry about, but if you live on a mountain, you definitely need to pay attention to the hydration thing.

upload_2018-3-20_23-57-15.jpeg

Your eggs should keep on track with this. If they don't, dehydrate using rice, or hydrate using a bowl of water.

Other than that, it's a bit variable. Different species have different humidity needs. It would kill a duck, but quail are frequently 'dry-hatched.'

3 Will not turning them kill or make them not hatch

Many people skip turning for the first 3 days (so as not to disturb developing veins), and many skip turning after day fourteen with no negative effects. But if you don't do it from days 3-14, the more often the better, it can kill them.

4 I have 6 rosters and 3 hens currently together in a coop (for these eggs) so on a scale of 20 how many is likely to be fertlized.

Your poor girls. You have far too many roosters. Try using one rooster for three hens. The hens won't lose all of the feathers on their backs that way. 20. One rooster is enough for eight-twenty hens, depending on your setup. Young cockerels, especially, will beset and gang-rape a hen.

5 Do the rosters fertilize all year round.

Yep. More in the spring, a little less in the winter.

6 Also a wierd thing my hens never get broody like ever so I had to take matters into my own hands. They seem to not care.

If you don't have a broody breed, they're highly unlikely to go broody. If you want broody hens, get a cochin or a silkie or a game hen.

7 tips and tricks

Haven't got any. I use broodies to hatch my eggs, so I'm regurgitating Pyxis and others. Here's a good article and good luck.

How to candle
 

kaythlin

Chirping
Oct 28, 2017
89
94
91
1. If the eggs overheat too much, it can kill chicks, but one or two degrees shouldn't be too much of an issue.

2. I'm not sure on the exact consequences of not adding humidity, but I know that you need both a warm and humid environment to hatch chicks. Hopefully someone more experienced with that aspect will come along.

3. Not turning the eggs can lower the hatch rate, as the embryo tends to stick to the side of the egg and not develop properly.

4. I would be surprised if more than 1 or 2 are not fertilized, that's a large rooster to hen ratio. In fact, I would recommend moving some of the roosters to other coops if you have them or selling them. Too many roosters can injure or stress out the hens.

5. Yes

6. What breeds do have? Certain breeds have been bred not to be broody. Breeds like silkies, australorps, and cochins tend to go broody a lot. Of course, it depends on the individual hen. I've had silkies that never went broody and silkies that started going broody at 7 months old and continued to do so every month.

Hope this helps! Good luck with your hatch.
Thanks really helped !
 

kaythlin

Chirping
Oct 28, 2017
89
94
91
1 What happens if the eggs overheat
They die if it's too much. If it doesn't kill them, it generally just moves the hatching date back towards you a bit. But there's no set formula as to how much will kill them. It greatly depends on the sort of eggs and how well-incubated they were beforehand.

2 What happens if you don't add humidity
You need it during lockdown or your chicks get shrink-wrapped and can't get out of the shells. They die.

During the first 2.5 weeks, humidity helps them retain the water weight that they lose through the shell. If they don't get enough, they're dehydrated. Think about the effects of dehydration on athletes. Not good. If you're lower in altitude (thicker air) you won't have as much to worry about, but if you live on a mountain, you definitely need to pay attention to the hydration thing.

View attachment 1304653
Your eggs should keep on track with this. If they don't, dehydrate using rice, or hydrate using a bowl of water.

Other than that, it's a bit variable. Different species have different humidity needs. It would kill a duck, but quail are frequently 'dry-hatched.'

3 Will not turning them kill or make them not hatch

Many people skip turning for the first 3 days (so as not to disturb developing veins), and many skip turning after day fourteen with no negative effects. But if you don't do it from days 3-14, the more often the better, it can kill them.

4 I have 6 rosters and 3 hens currently together in a coop (for these eggs) so on a scale of 20 how many is likely to be fertlized.

Your poor girls. You have far too many roosters. Try using one rooster for three hens. The hens won't lose all of the feathers on their backs that way. 20. One rooster is enough for eight-twenty hens, depending on your setup. Young cockerels, especially, will beset and gang-rape a hen.

5 Do the rosters fertilize all year round.

Yep. More in the spring, a little less in the winter.

6 Also a wierd thing my hens never get broody like ever so I had to take matters into my own hands. They seem to not care.

If you don't have a broody breed, they're highly unlikely to go broody. If you want broody hens, get a cochin or a silkie or a game hen.

7 tips and tricks

Haven't got any. I use broodies to hatch my eggs, so I'm regurgitating Pyxis and others. Here's a good article and good luck.

How to candle
This helped plenty. I really just let my chickens and ducks free range and I can't keep the rooster away from the hens I've tried they just jump the fence and I've tried wing clipping and I've got someone do it properly still won't work. I really don't have any other. Choice and selling them is DEFFINETLY the last thing I want to think of.
 

sylviethecochin

Free Ranging
Jun 14, 2017
5,499
11,305
701
Central PA
Rooster tethers. It takes them a while to get used to them, and they will fight them, but I've never had a rooster injure himself on one.

The uneducated may believe that you're fighting roosters, but it's the easiest way if you don't have a secure pen. Of course, you will need a shelter for each rooster, but it's far more humane to your hens.

upload_2018-3-21_0-40-59.jpeg

Not my picture.

EDT: as for the shelter, an igloo doghouse, or a dog crate with a light tarp thrown over it (preferably under a tree in hot weather) will work. No need to pay an arm and a leg.
 

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