I somehow only hatch roosters

LaFleche

Crowing
8 Years
Sep 22, 2012
2,306
8,172
404
Germany
Yes I realize, but I always assumed natural broody incubation is superior, I was interested to see you demonstrate varrying results in the hatch based on different natural hatch conditions. I have only incubated with an incubator.
Well, natural broody incubation can be superior to a bad incubator, but also a good incubator will be superior to a bad broody pooping on the eggs or even destroying them etc.

In any case to have good hatching results it is essential to have hatching eggs of good quality, meaning from a healthy and well alimented parent stock, fresh, good shell quality, regular size eggs for the specific breed.
 

JacinLarkwell

Crowing
Mar 19, 2020
3,933
4,949
263
South-Eastern Montana
Well, natural broody incubation can be superior to a bad incubator, but also a good incubator will be superior to a bad broody pooping on the eggs or even destroying them etc.

In any case to have good hatching results it is essential to have hatching eggs of good quality, meaning from a healthy and well alimented parent stock, fresh, good shell quality, regular size eggs for the specific breed.

I can attest to this. I had one hen that hatched out eggs until I stopped adding them and raised everyone well, and one that ended up leaving 2 that were pipped to dry out and die unfortunately
 

Fullcrazy

Chirping
Oct 3, 2015
35
25
77
When you put the eggs in the incubator, what percentage overall has hatched? I’ve heard people claim that female embryos are more sensitive to incubation conditions, so if you have several quitters maybe the incubation conditions aren’t perfect and they would have been female. Other than that it’s just a numbers game, one day let’s hope you’ll have a year of hens.
20/24. A fox took half of them when they were about 6 weeks, of which at least 3 were roos and 1 was a hen (sex link).
 

ariri30

Crowing
5 Years
May 18, 2015
973
2,087
292
Fair lawn nj
I tried incubating this year. First batch was rough, the Guage was off and I didn't have a 2nd one in there. 2 hatched, 1 was picked off by a fox (we lost about 15 this spring, in a few days, but the run is sorted now) the other is a nice little roo. Second hatch went well. Some sex link, and random other barnyard mixes. Out of the sex link ones, 5 were roos and 1 was a hen. In the fox issue, I lost the hen and 3 little roos. I've got 10 chicks about 10 weeks old, and I think they are all roosters. I'm 11/11 roosters. It's just absolutely insane that I won't get a single hen from these hatches! It makes me wonder if hatching eggs even makes sense, or if I should just pay for started pullets.
Seems like you have quite a few roosters there. Last year I managed to hatched only one pullet out of 16 hatched. This year I think it’s more like 50/50
 

ariri30

Crowing
5 Years
May 18, 2015
973
2,087
292
Fair lawn nj
I’m not sure if you’re planning on filling your freezer with them or not, but with the whole talk of this will be a dark winter, some homegrown meat in the freezer will be nice.
You guys have taught me a lot. Now please give me some courage to cull all the extra cockerel. Will I ever get to the point to be comfortable with it? 😏
 

Trisseh

Songster
Premium Feather Member
Jun 21, 2019
785
2,384
181
Canada
I’m in the same boat with my quail right now. I was hopeful I had 50/50, but my favorite crowed when I was holding him yesterday, my other favorite has foam, and I already have 3 confirmed males. That leaves 2 that I’m not sure on, but I have a feeling the bigger tuxedo one is male. 🤦‍♀️ I really should cull them and eat them, I have more eggs in the incubator to replace them anyways, but I don’t know if I can do it...
 

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