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I think I have a few too many

Discussion in 'Managing Your Flock' started by Joplus, Jan 6, 2016.

  1. Joplus

    Joplus Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I'm considering rehoming a few hens because I really don't need this many and I have chicks on the way too. I originally wanted two of each but now maybe one. And my older girls I love and they're still laying nice huge eggs so I don't want to do that either. I just can't decide and I'd like to keep them all but it's a lot. Here's what I have:
    4 Buff Orphington (3.5yrs, 1.5yrs, and 9 months)
    3 RIRs (3.5yrs, and 5 months)
    3 Marans (black, blue and wheaten 4 months)
    2 Black Austrolorps (3.5 months)
    White Ameracauna (3 years)
    Mixed Ameracauna (9 months)
    Barred Rock (3.5 years)
    Leghorn (5 months)
    Black Sex Link (5 months). Any suggestions? Thanks
     
  2. keesmom

    keesmom Overrun With Chickens

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    How big are your coop and run? How many chicks do you have coming?
     
  3. Joplus

    Joplus Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I have a large run 25 feet by 100 feet. Plus 4 big coops. My coops each are not too big with all the necessities, nest box, roost, etc. They eat feed under the coops. There's a river rock water dish area.
    [​IMG]
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    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Jan 6, 2016
  4. Mrs. K

    Mrs. K Overrun With Chickens

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    sell the young ones, you can make a little money to pay for the new chicks coming in, then, as much as you like the older birds, more than likely they will naturally begin to die, and you will need new birds next year.

    Mrs K
     
    1 person likes this.
  5. aart

    aart Chicken Juggler!

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    My Coop
    What is that other animal in there......where are you located?

    I stew or sell my older hens(2.5yo) every fall to make room for new layers.
     
  6. Joplus

    Joplus Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I'm in Arizona. That's a Patagonian Cavy (it was a gift). But of course he needs a little space in there too. There's a guinea pig in there too. I think we should eat my older ones but that's a tough choice. I'll see if my husband agrees. The older girls are such good layers still. I want like 5 less hens but I don't want to end up eggless at any point either. We use a lot of eggs and share with our neighbors.
     
  7. aart

    aart Chicken Juggler!

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    My Coop
     
  8. Joplus

    Joplus Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Oh I see. I incubated the young ones and already sold the roosters and two pullets, so sort of paying for themselves. I want every one I have but that leaves no room for keeping any hens out of the batch of eggs in my incubator now. Maybe I'll just keep one. There's barred rock, ameraucana, leghorns, and RIRs in my incubator but who knows what I'll get out of 3 dozen eggs. Thank you for your advice.
     
  9. aart

    aart Chicken Juggler!

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    SW Michigan
    My Coop
    When I hatch, I eat or sell all the extra cockerels by about 15 weeks old......sell/trade the extra pullets and keep the number of pullets I need.
     
    Last edited: Jan 7, 2016
  10. ladyearth

    ladyearth Chillin' With My Peeps

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    This all reminds me of the "Twilight Zone " episode.. "To Serve Man"

    .I wonder if those aliens used "restraining cones".. I would like to have asked Rod Serling....
    I know I know I wont get into that argument
     

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