Injecting chicken eggs?

Discussion in 'Managing Your Flock' started by lost, May 24, 2008.

  1. lost

    lost Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Might sound like a stupid question.Somebody told her at her job that they new someone.That injected the eggs with food coloring is this true.If it is how in the world could you inject the egg with out breaking it .Said the person done it at easter for the differant color chick .Please dont laugh.Just wanted to know if it was true.[​IMG]
     
  2. chickenannie

    chickenannie Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I don't think it's true. They dye the chicks afterward.
     
  3. lost

    lost Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I didnt thimk it was its no way . wouldn't the dye be bad for the chick i wouldn't do it
     
    Last edited: May 24, 2008
  4. Crystalchic

    Crystalchic Gone for a bit

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    I read in my chicken book that it is done to identify chickens. There is a way to do it.
     
  5. MissPrissy

    MissPrissy Overrun With Chickens Premium Member

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    Yes, they do. One of the large hatcheries colors chicks for easter. The dye is most often injected into the egg a few days prior to hatching. Many people find it cruel but it is usally male leghorns and a way for them to sell alot of them as a novelty.
     
  6. lost

    lost Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Still sounds a little not nice .I wouldn't want to be dyed. some people might say they are just chickens.My wife want even let me eat one of our rooster.so only eggs here:D
     
  7. lost

    lost Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Thank yall for your replies. God Bless ya'll
     
  8. chiknwhisperer

    chiknwhisperer Chillin' With My Peeps

    May 9, 2008
    Lowell, IN
    I bought my first two chicks at Easter and one was blue and the other red. My blue one turned out to be a Deleware and the other is a RIR. They were injected. MY Deleware is crowing as of two days ago but the other one isn't yet but I think it is only a matter of time. After those two I went back and got another ( undyed ) chick. And now I also have two three week old black minorcas. I guess I got chicken fever lol
     
  9. chcknrs

    chcknrs Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Actually the chicks are straight run, since they are injected while in the shell, and no one can yet, that I know of, sex an egg.

    Silly girl! [​IMG]
     
  10. Wolf-Kim

    Wolf-Kim Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Easter chicks are dyed both ways.

    Some are dyed while still in the shell. They use a needle and carefully inject dye and then reseal the hole with wax. The chicks hatch out whatever color dye was injected. This method was first developed for research and identification. It had practical uses at first. That way you could track which chick was which, instead of legbands. I also read that it was used to study wild water fowl. I still have a hard time seeing a momma mallard and her raindbow colored brood. LOL The ones dyed in the shell are straight run.

    I have also heard that the chicks were dipped or dunked. I'm sure this way has quite a bit more risk behind it. These I can see being the majority extra cockerels as MissPrissy stated. The larger hatcheries usually have a surplus of cockerels, so sometimes they'll dunk them and send them off to be bought and kept(for however long).

    I think if I were to color any of my chicks, I would do it while they were still in the egg. The idea of dunking my new chicks into dye just doesn't seem quite right to me, but then again I have watched day-old chicks fall into their water and be just fine.

    Just to be clear, the dye is injected into the egg and not the chick. So they are coloring the fluid that the chick is already in.

    -Kim
     
    Last edited: May 24, 2008

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